Tag Archives: human health

Flavonols: definition, structure, food sources

Flavonols are polyphenols belonging to the flavonoid family.
They are colorless molecules that accumulate mainly in the outer and aerial tissues, therefore skin and leaves, of fruit and vegetables, since their biosynthesis is stimulated by light. They are virtually absent in the flesh.
They are the most common flavonoids in fruit and vegetables, where they are generally present in relatively low concentrations.
Due to their widespread in nature and human diet, they should be taken into consideration when the positive effect on health associated with fruit and vegetable consumption is examined. Their effect is probably related to their ability to:

  • act as antioxidants;
  • act as anti-inflammatory agents;
  • act as anticancer factors;
  • regulate different cellular signaling pathways; an example is the action of quercetin, the most widespread flavonols, on the oxidative stress-induced MAPK activities.

CONTENTS

Chemical structure of flavonols

Chemically, these molecules differ from many other flavonoids since they have a double bond between positions 2 and 3 and an oxygen (a ketone group) in position 4 of the C ring, like flavones from which, however, they differ in the presence of a hydroxyl group at the position 3. Therefore, flavonol skeleton is a 3-hydroxyflavone.

3-Hydroxyflavone, the basic skeleton structure of flavonols, polyphenols belonging to the flavonoid family
3-Hydroxyflavone

The 3-hydroxyl group can link a sugar, that is, it can be glycosylated.
Like many other flavonoids, most of them is found in fruit and vegetables, and in plant-derived foods, in glycosylated form. The sugar associated with flavonols is often glucose or rhamnose, but other sugars may also be involved, such as:

  • galactose;
  • arabinose;
  • xylose;
  • glucuronic acid.

Flavonols are mainly represented by glycosides of:

  • quercetin;
  • kaempferol;
  • myricetin;
  • isorhamnetin.
Skeletal formulas of flavonols quercetin, kaempferol, myricetin, isorhamnetin
Flavonols

The most ubiquitous compounds are glycosylated derivatives of quercetin and kaempferol; in nature, these two molecules have respectively about 280 and 350 different glycosidic combinations.
Finally, it should be underlined that sugar moiety influences flavonol bioavailability.

Foods rich in flavonols

The major sources in human diet are:

  • fruit;
  • vegetables;
  • beverages such as red wine and tea.

In human diet, the richest source are capers, which contain up to 490 mg/100 g fresh weight (FW), but they are also abundant in onions, leeks, broccoli, curly kale, berries (e.g. blueberries), grapes and some herbs and spices, for example dill weed (Anethum graveolens). In these sources, their content ranges between 10 and 100 mg/100 g FW.
Even cocoa, green teablack tea, and red wine are good sources of flavonols. In wine, together with other polyphenols such as catechins, proanthocyanidins and low molecular weight polyphenols, they contribute to the astringency of the beverage.

Main flavonols in foods

The main flavonols in foods, listed in decreasing order of abundance, are quercetin, kaempferol, myricetin and ishoramnetin.

Quercetin

The richest sources of quercetin are capers, followed by onions, asparagus, lettuce and berries; in many other fruit and vegetables, it is present in smaller amounts, between 0.1 and 5 mg/100 g FW.
This flavonol is also present in cocoa and it could be one of its main protective agents against LDL oxidation.
Together with isoflavones, quercetin glycosides are the most well-absorbed polyphenols, followed by flavanones and catechins (on the contrary, gallic acid derivatives of catechins are among the least well absorbed polyphenols, together with anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins).

Kaempferol

Typical dietary sources of kaempferol include vegetables, such as spinach, kale and endive, with concentrations between 0.1 and 27 mg/100 g FW, and some spices such as chives, fennel and tarragon, with concentrations between 6.5 and 19 mg/100 g FW.
Fruit is a poor source of the molecule, with content down to 0.1 mg/100 g FW.

Myricetin

Myricetin is the third most abundant flavonol. It is found in some spices, such as oregano, parsley, and fennel, with concentrations between 2 and 20 mg/100 g FW, but also in tea, 0.5-1.6 mg/100 ml, and red wine, 0-9.7 mg/100 ml.
In fruit, it is only found in high concentrations in berries, while in most other fruit and vegetables it is present in a content of less than 0.2 mg/100 g FW.

Isorhamnetin

A fourth flavonol, less abundant than the previous ones, is isorhamnetin. It is only present in some foods such as some spices: chives, 5.0-8.5 mg/100 g FW, fennel, 9.3 mg/100 g FW, tarragon, 5 mg/100 g FW.
In fruit and vegetables it is only present in almonds, with a concentration between 1.2 and 10.3 mg/100 g FW, pears and onions.

References

de la Rosa L.A., Alvarez-Parrilla E., Gonzàlez-Aguilar G.A. Fruit and vegetable phytochemicals: chemistry, nutritional value, and stability. 1th Edition. Wiley J. & Sons, Inc., Publication, 2010

Han X., Shen T. and Lou H. Dietary polyphenols and their biological significance. Int J Mol Sci 2007;9:950-988. doi:10.3390/i8090950

Manach C., Scalbert A., Morand C., Rémésy C., and Jime´nez L. Polyphenols: food sources and bioavailability. Am J Clin Nutr 2004;79(5):727-47 doi:10.1093/ajcn/79.5.727

Tsao R. Chemistry and biochemistry of dietary polyphenols. Nutrients 2010;2:1231-46. doi:10.3390/nu2121231

Anthocyanins: definition, foods, and health benefits

Anthocyanins are a subgroup of flavonoids, therefore they are polyphenols, which give plants their distinctive colors.
They are water soluble pigments and are present in the vacuolar sap of the epidermal tissues of flowers and fruit.
They are responsible for the colors of the most of the petals, fruits and vegetables, and of some varieties of cereals such as black rice. In fact, they impart red, pink and purple to blue colors to berries, red apples, red grapes, cherries, and of many other fruits, red lettuce, red cabbage, onions or eggplant, but also red wine.
Together with carotenoids, they are responsible for autumn leaf color.
Finally, anthocyanins contribute to attract animals when a fruit is ready to eat or a flower is ready for pollination.

They are bioactive compounds found in plant foods that have a double interest for man:

  • the first one, a technological interest, due to their effects on the organoleptic characteristics of food products;
  • the other due to their healthy properties, being implicated in the protection against cardiovascular risk.
    In fact:

in vitro, they have an antioxidant activity, due to their ability to delocalize electrons and form resonance structures, and a protective role against oxidation of low density lipoproteins (LDL);

like other polyphenols, such as catechins, proanthocyanidins and other uncolored flavonoids, they can regulate different signaling pathways involved in cell growth, differentiation and survival.

CONTENTS

Chemical structure of anthocyanins

The basic chemical structure is flavylium cation (2-phenyl-1-benzopyrilium), which links hydroxyl (-OH) and/or methoxyl (-OCH3) groups, and one or more sugars.
The sugar-free molecule is called anthocyanidins.

Skeletal formula of the basic skeleton of anthocyanins: the flavylium cation or 2-phenyl-1-benzopyrilium
Flavylium Cation

Depending on the number and position of hydroxyl and methoxyl groups, various anthocyanidins have been described, and of these, six are commonly found in vegetables and fruits:

  • pelargonidin
  • cyaniding
  • delphinidin
  • petunidin
  • peonidin
  • malvidin
Skeletal formulas of different types of anthocyanins
Antocyanins

Anthocyanins, as most of the other flavonoids, are present in plants and plant foods in the form of glycosides, that is, linked to one or more sugar units.
The most common carbohydrates present in these natural pigments are:

The sugars are linked mainly to the C3 position as 3-monoglycosides, to the C3 and C5 positions as diglycosides (with the possible forms: 3-diglycosides, 3,5-diglycosides, and 3-diglycoside-5-monoglycosides). Glycosylations have been also found at C7, C3′ and C5′ positions.
The structure of these molecules is further complicated by the bond to the sugar unit of different acyl substituents such as:

  • aliphatic acids, such as acetic, malic, succinic and malonic acid;
  • cinnamic acids (aromatic substituents), such as sinapic, ferulic and p-coumaric acid;
  • finally, there are pigments with both aromatic and aliphatic substituents.

Furthermore, some anthocyanins have several acylated sugars in the molecule; these anthocyanins are sometimes called polyglycosides.

Depending on the type of hydroxylation, methoxylation and glycosylation patterns, and the different substituents linked to the sugar units, more than 500 different anthocyanins have been identified that are based on 31 anthocyanidins. Among these 31 monomers:

  • 30% are from cyanidin;
  • 22% are from delphinidin;
  • 18% are from pelargonidin.

Methylated derivatives of cyanidin, delphinidin and pelargonidin, namely peonidin, malvidin, and petunidin, all together represent 20% of the anthocyanins.
Therefore, up to 90% of the most frequently encountered anthocyanins are related to delphinidin, pelargonidin, cyanidin, and their methylated derivatives.

Role of pH

The color of these molecules is influenced by the pH of the vacuole where they are stored, ranging in color from:

  • red, under very acidic conditions;
  • to purple-blue, in intermediate pH conditions;
  • until yellow-green, in alkaline conditions.

In addition to the pH, the color of these flavonoids can be affected by the degree of hydroxylation or methylation pattern of the A and B rings, and by glycosylation pattern.
Finally, the color of certain plant pigments result from complexes between anthocyanins, flavones and metal ions.
It should be noted that anthocyanins are often used as pH indicators thanks to the differences in chemical structure that occur in response to changes in pH.

References

de la Rosa L.A., Alvarez-Parrilla E., Gonzàlez-Aguilar G.A. Fruit and vegetable phytochemicals: chemistry, nutritional value, and stability. 1th Edition. Wiley J. & Sons, Inc., Publication, 2010

de Pascual-Teresa S., Moreno D.A. and García-Viguera C. Flavanols and anthocyanins in cardiovascular health: a review of current evidence. Int J Mol Sci 2010;11:1679-1703. doi:10.3390/ijms11041679

Escribano-Bailòn M.T., Santos-Buelga C., Rivas-Gonzalo J.C. Anthocyanins in cereals. J Chromatogr A 2004:1054;129-141. doi:10.1016/j.chroma.2004.08.152

Han X., Shen T. and Lou H. Dietary polyphenols and their biological significance. Int J Mol Sci 2007;9:950-988. doi:10.3390/i8090950

Manach C., Scalbert A., Morand C., Rémésy C., and Jime´nez L. Polyphenols: food sources and bioavailability. Am J Clin Nutr 2004;79(5):727-47 doi:10.1093/ajcn/79.5.727

Ottaviani J.I., Kwik-Uribe C., Keen C.L., and Schroeter H. Intake of dietary procyanidins does not contribute to the pool of circulating flavanols in humans. Am J Clin Nutr 2012;95:851-8. doi:10.3945/​ajcn.111.028340

Tsao R. Chemistry and biochemistry of dietary polyphenols. Nutrients 2010;2:1231-1246. doi:10.3390/nu2121231

Proanthocyanidins: structure and intestinal absorption

Proanthocyanidins or condensed tannins, also called pycnogenols and leukocyanidins, are polyphenolic compounds (in particular they are a flavonoid subgroup) widely distributed in the plant kingdom, second only to lignin as the most abundant phenol in nature.
They are present in high concentrations in various parts of the plants such as flowers, fruits, berries, seeds (e.g. in grape seeds), and bark (e.g. pine bark).

Together with anthocyanins and their oxidation products, and catechins, they are the most abundant flavonoids in human diet and it has been suggested that they constitute a significant fraction of the polyphenols ingested in the Western diet.
Therefore, condensed tannins should be taken into consideration when the epidemiological association between the intake of polyphenols, especially flavonoids, and chronic diseases are examined.

CONTENTS

Chemical structure of proanthocyanidins

Condensed tannins have a complex chemical structure being oligomers (dimers to pentamers) or polymers (six or more units, up to 60) of catechins or flavanols, which are joined by carbon-carbon bonds.

Basic skeleton structure of procyanidins
Basic Skeleton of Procyanidins

They may consist exclusively of:

  • (epi)catechin, and they are named procyanidins;
  • (epi)afzelechin, and they are named propelargonidins;
  • (epi)gallocatechin, and they are named prodelphinidins.

Propelargonidins and prodelphinidins are less common in nature and in foods than procyanidins.

Depending on the bonds between monomers, proanthocyanidins have a:

  • B-type structure, if the polymerization occurs via carbon-carbon bond between the position 8 of the terminal unit and the 4 of the extender (or C4-C6);
  • A-type structure, less frequent, if monomers are doubly linked via an ether bond C2-O-C7 or C2-O-C5 plus a B-type bond.

Procyanidins

The most common dimers are B-type procyanidins, B1 to B8, formed by catechin or epicatechin; in B1, B2, B3 and B-4 dimers, the two flavanol units are joined by a C4-C8 bond; in B5, B6, B7 and B8 dimers the two units are joined by C4-C6 bond.

Skeletal formulas of procyanidin B1, B2, B3, and B4
Procyanidins B1, B2, B3, and B4

Procyanidin C1 is a B-type trimer.

Procyanidin A-2 is an example of A-type procyanidin.

Intestinal absorption of proanthocyanidins

Condensed tannins are poorly absorbed from the intestine; together with anthocyanins and gallic acid ester derivatives of tea catechins, they are the least well-absorbed polyphenols.
It seems that low molecular weight oligomers (2-3 monomers) may be absorbed as such while polymers are not.
In the systemic circulation, dimers reach concentrations of two orders of magnitude lower than those of catechins.
It seems that condensed tannins with a degree of polymerization greater than three transit into the stomach and small intestine without significant modifications, and then, into the large intestine, they are catabolized by colonic microflora, with production of phenylpropionic, phenilvaleric and phenylacetic acids. These degradation products have been suggested to be the major metabolites of proanthocyanidins in healthy humans.

Procyanidins and catechins

It had been proposed that the catabolism of procyanidins in the gastrointestinal tract lead to the release of monomeric catechins, thus indirectly contributing to their systemic pool in humans. In recent years, it has been shown that this does not happen because procyanidins do not significantly contribute to:

  • the concentration of catechin metabolites in the systemic circulation;
  • the total catechin metabolites excreted in the urine;
  • finally, they do not significantly affect plasma metabolite profile derived from catechol-O-methyltransferase activity.

Therefore, analyzing the potential health benefits associated with the intake of foods containing these phytochemicals, catechins and procyanidins should be considered distinct classes of related compounds.

References

de la Rosa L.A., Alvarez-Parrilla E., Gonzàlez-Aguilar G.A. Fruit and vegetable phytochemicals: chemistry, nutritional value, and stability. 1th Edition. Wiley J. & Sons, Inc., Publication, 2010

Gu L., Kelm M.A., Hammerstone J.F., Beecher G., Holden J., Haytowitz D., Gebhardt S., and Prior R.L. Concentrations of proanthocyanidins in common foods and estimations of normal consumption. J Nutr 2004;134(3):613-617. doi:10.1093/jn/134.3.613

Han X., Shen T. and Lou H. Dietary polyphenols and their biological significance. Int J Mol Sci 2007;9:950-988. doi:10.3390/i8090950

Manach C., Scalbert A., Morand C., Rémésy C., and Jime´nez L. Polyphenols: food sources and bioavailability. Am J Clin Nutr 2004;79(5):727-47 doi:10.1093/ajcn/79.5.727

Nandakumar V., Singh T., and Katiyar S.K. Multi-targeted prevention and therapy of cancer by proanthocyanidins. Cancer Lett 2008;269(2):378-387. doi:10.1016/j.canlet.2008.03.049

Ottaviani J.I., Kwik-Uribe C., Keen C.L., and Schroeter H. Intake of dietary procyanidins does not contribute to the pool of circulating flavanols in humans. Am J Clin Nutr 2012;95:851-8. doi:10.3945/ajcn.111.028340

Santos-Buelga C. and Scalbert A. Proanthocyanidins and tannin-like compounds: nature, occurrence, dietary intake and effects on nutrition and health. J Sci Food Agr 2000;80(7):1094-1117. doi:10.1002/(SICI)1097-0010(20000515)80:7<1094::AID-JSFA569>3.0.CO;2-1

Tsao R. Chemistry and biochemistry of dietary polyphenols. Nutrients 2010;2:1231-1246. doi:10.3390/nu2121231

Wang Y.,Chung S., Song W.O., and Chun O.K. Estimation of daily proanthocyanidin intake and major food sources in the U.S. diet. J Nutr 2011;141(3):447-452. doi:10.3945/jn.110.133900

Catechins: structure and food sources

Catechins or flavanols, with flavonols such as quercetin, and flavones such as luteolin, are a subgroup of flavonoids among the most widespread in nature.
Flavanols and proanthocyanidins, together with anthocyanins and their oxidation products, are the most abundant flavonoids in human diet.

CONTENTS

Chemical structure of catechins

Chemically they differ from many other flavonoids as:

  • they lack the double bond between positions 2 and 3 of the C ring;
  • they not have a keto group at position 4;
  • they have a hydroxyl group in position 3, and for this reason they are also called flavan-3-ols.
Basic skeleton structure of catechins, among the most abundant flavonoids in human diet
Basic Skeleton of Catechins

Another distinctive feature of flavan-3-ols is their ability to form oligomers (two to ten units) or polymers (eleven or more units, up to 60 units) called proanthocyanidins or condensed tannins.

Foods high in catechins

Flavanols commonly found in plant-derived food products are catechin, epicatechin, gallocatechin, epigallocatechin, and their gallic acid ester derivatives: catechin gallate, gallocatechin gallate, epicatechin gallate, and epigallocatechin gallate or EGCG.

Skeletal formulas of catechin, epicatechin, gallocatechin, epigallocatechin
Catechins

Flavanols present with higher frequency are catechin and epicatechin, which are also among the most common known flavonoids, and almost as popular as the related flavonol quercetin.
Cocoa and green tea are by far the richest sources in flavanols. In these foods the main flavonoids are catechin and epicatechin (cocoa is also a good source of epigallocatechin), but also their gallic acid ester derivatives, the gallocatechins.

Structural formulas of gallic acid ester derivatives of catechins
Gallic Acid Ester Derivatives of Catechins

However, they are also present in many fruits, especially in the skins of apples, blueberries (Vaccinium myrtillus) and grapes, in vegetables, red wine and beer, and peanuts.
As in many cases flavanols are present in the seeds or peels of fruits and vegetables, their intake may be limited by the fact that these parts are discarded during processing or while eaten.
Furthermore, in contrast to other flavonoids, catechins are not glycosylated in foods.
Proanthocyanidins, that is polymeric flavan-3-ols, are also commonly found in plant-derived food products. Their presence has been reported in the skin of peanuts and almonds, as in the berries.

Green and black tea

Green tea is an excellent source of flavonoids. The main flavonoids present in the leaves of the tea (as in cocoa beans) are catechin and epicatechin, monomeric flavanols, together with their gallate derivatives such as EGCG.
Epigallocatechin gallate is the most abundant catechin in green tea and it seems to have an important role in determining green tea benefits, as the reduction of:

  • vascular inflammation;
  • blood pressure;
  • concentration of oxidized LDL.

Black tea (fermented tea) contains fewer monomeric flavanols, as they are oxidized during fermentation of the leaves to more complex polyphenols such as theaflavins (theaflavin digallate, theaflavin-3-gallate, and theaflavin-3′-gallate, all dimers) and thearubigins (polymers).
Theaflavins and thearubigins are present only in the tea; their concentrations in brewed tea are between 50- and 100-folds lesser than in tea leaves.

It should be noted that tea epicatechins are remarkably stable to heat in acidic environment: at pH 5, only about 15% is degraded after seven hours in boiling water (therefore, adding lemon juice to brewed tea does not cause any reduction in their content).

Cocoa and cocoa products

Cocoa has the highest content of polyphenols and flavanols per serving, a concentration greater than those found in green tea and red wine. Most of the flavonoids present in cocoa beans and derived products, such as black chocolate, are catechin and epicatechin, monomeric flavanols, but also epigallocatechin, and their derivatives such as the gallocatechins; among polymers, proanthocyanidins are also important.

Fruits, vegetables, and legumes

Catechin and epicatechin are the main flavanols in fruits. They are found in many fruits in different concentrations, respectively, between 5-3 and 0.5-6 mg/100 g fresh weight.
On the contrary, gallocatechin, epicatechin gallate, epigallocatechin, and epigallocatechin gallate are present in various fruits such as red grapes, berries, apples, peaches and plums, but in very low concentrations, less than 1mg/100 g fresh weight.
Except for lentils and broad beans, few legumes and vegetables contain catechins, and in very low concentrations, less than 1.5 mg/100 g fresh weight.

References

de la Rosa L.A., Alvarez-Parrilla E., Gonzàlez-Aguilar G.A. Fruit and vegetable phytochemicals: chemistry, nutritional value, and stability. 1th Edition. Wiley J. & Sons, Inc., Publication, 2010

de Pascual-Teresa S., Moreno D.A. and García-Viguera C. Flavanols and anthocyanins in cardiovascular health: a review of current evidence. Int J Mol Sci 2010;11:1679-1703. doi:10.3390/ijms11041679

Han X., Shen T. and Lou H. Dietary polyphenols and their biological significance. Int J Mol Sci 2007;9:950-988. doi:10.3390/i8090950

Manach C., Scalbert A., Morand C., Rémésy C., and Jime´nez L. Polyphenols: food sources and bioavailability. Am J Clin Nutr 2004;79(5):727-47 doi:10.1093/ajcn/79.5.727

Tsao R. Chemistry and biochemistry of dietary polyphenols. Nutrients 2010;2:1231-1246. doi:10.3390/nu2121231

Flavonoids: chimical structure, classification, and examples

Flavonoids are the most abundant polyphenols in human diet, representing about 2/3 of all those ones ingested. Like other phytochemicals, they are the products of secondary metabolism of plants and, currently, it is not possible to determine precisely their number, even if over 4000 have been identified.
In fruits and vegetables, they are usually found in the form of glycosides and sometimes as acylglycosides, while acylated, methylated and sulfate molecules are less frequent and in lower concentrations.
They are water-soluble and accumulate in cell vacuoles.

CONTENTS

Chemical structure of flavonoids

Their basic structure is a skeleton of diphenylpropane, namely, two benzene rings (ring A and B, see figure) linked by a three carbon chain that forms a closed pyran ring (heterocyclic ring containing oxygen, the C ring) with benzenic A ring. Therefore, their structure is also referred to as C6-C3-C6.

Basic skeleton structure of flavonoids, the most abundant polyphenols in human diet
Basic Skeleton of Flavonoids

In most cases, B ring is attached to position 2 of C ring, but it can also bind in position 3 or 4; this, together with the structural features of the ring B and the patterns of glycosylation and hydroxylation of the three rings, makes the flavonoids one of the larger and more diversified groups of phytochemicals, so not only of polyphenols, in nature.
Their biological activities, for example they are potent antioxidants, depend both on the structural characteristics and the pattern of glycosylation.

Classification of flavonoids

They can be subdivided into different subclasses depending on the carbon of the C ring on which B ring is attached, and the degree of unsaturation and oxidation of the C ring.
Flavonoids in which B ring is linked in position 3 of the ring C are called isoflavones; those in which B ring is linked in position 4, neoflavonoids, while those in which the B ring is linked in position 2 can be further subdivided into several subgroups on the basis of the structural features of the C ring. These subgroup are: flavones, flavonols, flavanones, flavanonols, flavanols or catechins and anthocyanins.
Finally, flavonoids with open C ring are called chalcones.

Basic skeleton structure of flavonoid subclasses
Flavonoid Subclasses

Flavones

They have a double bond between positions 2 and 3 and a ketone in position 4 of the C ring. Most flavones of vegetables and fruits has a hydroxyl group in position 5 of the A ring, while the hydroxylation in other positions, for the most part in position 7 of the A ring or 3′ and 4′ of the B ring may vary according to the taxonomic classification of the particular vegetable or fruit.
Glycosylation occurs primarily on position 5 and 7, methylation and acylation on the hydroxyl groups of the B ring.
Some flavones, such as nobiletin and tangeretin, are polymethoxylated.

Flavonols

Compared to flavones, they have a hydroxyl group in position 3 of the C ring, which may also be glycosylated. Again, like flavones, flavonols are very diverse in methylation and hydroxylation patterns as well, and, considering the different glycosylation patterns, they are perhaps the most common and largest subgroup of flavonoids in fruits and vegetables. For example, quercetin is present in many plant foods.

Flavanones

Flavanones, also called dihydroflavones, have the C ring saturated; therefore, unlike flavones, the double bond between positions 2 and 3 is saturated and this is the only structural difference between the two subgroups of flavonoids.
The flavanones can be multi-hydroxylated, and several hydroxyl groups can be glycosylated and/or methylated.
Some have unique patterns of substitution, for example, furanoflavanones, prenylated flavanones, pyranoflavanones or benzylated flavanones, giving a great number of substituted derivatives.
Over the past 15 years, the number of flavanones discovered is significantly increased.

Flavanonols

Flavanonols, also called dihydroflavonols, are the 3-hydroxy derivatives of flavanones; they are an highly diversified and multisubstituted subgroup.

Isoflavones

As anticipated, isoflavones are a subgroup of flavonoids in which the B ring is attached to position 3 of the C ring. They have structural similarities to estrogens, such as estradiol, and for this reason they are also called phytoestrogens.

Catechins

Catechins are also referred to flavan-3-ols as the hydroxyl group is almost always bound to position 3 of C ring; they are called flavanols as well.
Catechins have two chiral centers in the molecule, on positions 2 and 3, then four possible diastereoisomers. Epicatechin is the isomer with the cis configuration and catechin is the one with the trans configuration. Each of these configurations has two stereoisomers, namely, (+)-epicatechin and (-)-epicatechin, (+)-catechin and (-)-catechin.
(+)-Catechin and (-)-epicatechin are the two isomers most often present in edible plants.
Another important feature of flavanols, particularly of catechin and epicatechin, is the ability to form polymers, called proanthocyanidins or condensed tannins. The name “proanthocyanidins” is due to the fact that an acid-catalyzed cleavage produces anthocyanidins.
Proanthocyanidins typically contain 2 to 60 monomers of flavanols.
Monomeric and oligomeric flavanols (containing 2 to 7 monomers) are strong antioxidants.

Anthocyanidins

Chemically, anthocyanidins are flavylium cations and are generally present as chloride salts.
They are the only group of flavonoids that gives plants colors (all other flavonoids are colorless).
Anthocyanins are glycosides of anthocyanidins. Sugar units are bound mostly to position 3 of the C ring and they are often conjugated with phenolic acids, such as ferulic acid.
The color of the anthocyanins depends on the pH and also by methylation or acylation at the hydroxyl groups on the A and B rings.

Chalcones

Chalcones and dihydrochalcones are flavonoids with open structure; they are classified as flavonoids because they have similar synthetic pathways.

References

de la Rosa L.A., Alvarez-Parrilla E., Gonzàlez-Aguilar G.A. Fruit and vegetable phytochemicals: chemistry, nutritional value, and stability. 1th Edition. Wiley J. & Sons, Inc., Publication, 2010

Han X., Shen T. and Lou H. Dietary polyphenols and their biological significance. Int J Mol Sci 2007;9:950-988. doi:10.3390/i8090950

Manach C., Scalbert A., Morand C., Rémésy C., and Jime´nez L. Polyphenols: food sources and bioavailability. Am J Clin Nutr 2004;79(5):727-47 doi:10.1093/ajcn/79.5.727

Panche A.N., Diwan A.D., and  Chandra S.R. Flavonoids: an overview. J Nutr Sci. 2016;5:e47. doi:10.1017/jns.2016.41

Tsao R. Chemistry and biochemistry of dietary polyphenols. Nutrients 2010;2:1231-1246. doi:10.3390/nu2121231

Alkaline diet and health benefits

The acid-ash hypothesis posits that protein and grain foods, with a low potassium intake, produce a diet acid load, net acid excretion, increased urine calcium, and release of calcium from the skeleton, leading to osteoporosis.” (Fenton et al., 2009, see References).
Is it true?
Calcium, present in bones in form of carbonates and phosphates, represents a large reservoir of base in the body. In response to an acid load such as the high protein diets these salts are released into the circulation to bring about pH homeostasis. This calcium is lost in the urine and it has been estimated that the quantity lost with the such diet over time could be as high as almost 480 g over 20 years or almost half the skeletal mass of calcium!
Even these losses of calcium may be buffered by ingestion of foods that are alkali rich as fruit and vegetables, and on-line information promotes an alkaline diet for bone health as well as a number of books, a recent meta-analysis has shown that the causal association between osteoporotic bone disease and dietary acid load is not supported by evidence and there is no evidence that the alkaline diet is protective of bone health (but it is protective against the risk for kidney stones).

Note: it is possible that fruit and vegetables are beneficial to bone health through mechanisms other than via the acid-ash hypothesis.

And protein?
Excess dietary protein with high acid renal load may decrease bone density, if not buffered by ingestion of foods that are alkali rich, that is fruit and vegetables. However, an adequate protein intake is needed for the maintenance of bone integrity. Therefore, increasing the amount of fruit and vegetables may be necessary rather than reducing protein too much.
Therefore it is advisable to consume a normo-proteic diet rich in fruits and vegetables and poor in sodium, that is, a Mediterranean Diet-like eating patterns, eating foods with a negative acid load together with foods with a positive acid load. Example: pasta plus vegetables or meats plus vegetables and fruits (see figure below).

Alkaline Diet: Food and Acid Load
Food and Acid Load

Alkaline diet and muscle mass


As we age, there is a loss of muscle mass, which predispose to falls and fractures. A diet rich in potassium, obtained from fruits and vegetables, as well as a reduced acid load, results in preservation of muscle mass in older men and women.

Alkaline diet and growth hormone

In children, severe forms of metabolic acidosis are associated with low levels of growth hormone with resultant short stature; its correction with potassium or bicarbonate citrate increases growth hormone significantly and improves growth. In postmenopausal women, the use of enough potassium bicarbonate in the diet to neutralize the daily net acid load resulted in a significant increase in growth hormone and resultant osteocalcin.
Improving growth hormone levels may reduce cardiovascular risk factors, improve quality of life, body composition, and even memory and cognition.

Conclusion

Alkaline diet may result in a number of health benefits.

  • Increased fruits and vegetables would improve the K/Na ratio and may benefit bone health, reduce muscle wasting, as well as mitigate other chronic diseases such as hypertension and strokes.
  • The increase in growth hormone may improve many outcomes from cardiovascular health to memory and cognition.
  • The increase in intracellular magnesium is another added benefit of the alkaline diet (e.g. magnesium, required to activate vitamin D, would result in numerous added benefits in the vitamin D systems).

It should be noted that one of the first considerations in an alkaline diet, which includes more fruits and vegetables, is to know what type of soil they were grown in since this may significantly influence the mineral content and therefore their buffering capacity.

References

Fenton T.R., Lyon A.W., Eliasziw M., Tough S.C., Hanley D.A. Meta-analysis of the effect of the acid-ash hypothesis of osteoporosis on calcium balance. J Bone Miner Res 2009;24(11):1835-40. doi:10.1359/jbmr.090515

Fenton T.R., Lyon A.W., Eliasziw M., Tough S.C., Hanley D.A. Phosphate decreases urine calcium and increases calcium balance: a meta-analysis of the osteoporosis acid-ash diet hypothesis. Nutr J 2009;8:41. doi:10.1186/1475-2891-8-41

Fenton T.R., Tough S.C., Lyon A.W., Eliasziw M., Hanley D.A. “Causal assessment of dietary acid load and bone disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis applying Hill’s epidemiologic criteria for causality.” Nutr J 2011;10:41. doi:10.1186/1475-2891-10-41

Schwalfenberg G.K. The alkaline diet: is there evidence that an alkaline pH diet benefits health? J Environ Public Health 2012; Article ID 727630. doi:10.1155/2012/727630

Metabolic acidosis and human diet

Life depends on appropriate pH levels around and in living organisms and cells.
We requires a tightly controlled pH level in our serum of about 7.4 (a slightly alkaline range of 7.35 to 7.45) to avoid metabolic acidosis and survive. As a comparison, in the past 100 years the pH of the ocean has dropped from 8.2 to 8.1 because of increasing carbon dioxide (CO2) deposition with a negative impact on life in the ocean (it may lead to the collapse of the coral reefs).

Metabolic Acidosis: The pH Scale
Fig. 1 – The pH Scale

Even the mineral content of the food we eat (minerals are used as buffers to maintain pH within the aforementioned range) is considerabled influence by the pH of the soil in which plants are grown. The ideal pH of soil for the best overall availability of essential nutrients is between 6 and 7: an acidic soil below pH of 6 may have reduced magnesium and calcium, and soil above pH 7 may result in chemically unavailable zinc, iron, copper and manganese.

Metabolic acidosis and agricultural and industrial revolutions

In the human diet, there has been considerable change from the hunter gather civilization to the present in the pH and net acid load. With the agricultural revolution (last 10,000 years) and even more recently with industrialization (last 200 years) it has been seen:

  • an increase in sodium compared to potassium (the ratio potassium/sodium has reversed from 10 to 1 to a ratio of 1 to 3 in the modern diet) and in chloride compared to bicarbonate in the diet,;
  • a poor intake of magnesium and fiber;
  • a large intake of simple carbohydrates and saturated fats.

This results in a diet that may induce metabolic acidosis which is mismatched to the genetically determined nutritional requirements.
Moreover, with aging, there is a gradual loss of renal acid-base regulatory function and a resultant increase in diet-induced metabolic acidosis.
Finally, a high protein low-carbohydrate diet with its increased acid load results in very little change in blood chemistry, and pH, but results in many changes in urinary chemistry: urinary calcium, undissociated uric acid, and phosphate are increased, while urinary magnesium, urinary citrate and pH are decreased.
All this increases the risk for kidney stones.

pH as a protective barrier

The human body has an amazing ability to maintain a steady pH in the blood with the main compensatory mechanisms being renal and respiratory.
The pH in the body vary considerably from one area to another. The highest acidity is found in the stomach (pH of 1.35 to 3.5) and it aids in digestion and protects against opportunistic microbial organisms. The skin is quite acidic (pH 4-6.5) and this provides an acid mantle as a protective barrier to the environment against microbial overgrowth (this is also seen in the vagina where a pH of less than 4.7 protects against microbial overgrowth).
The urine have a variable pH from acid to alkaline depending on the need for balancing the internal environment.

Metabolici Acidosis: pH of Selected Fluids, Organs, and Membranes
Fig. 2 – pH of Selected Fluids, Organs, and Membranes
References

Fenton T.R., Lyon A.W., Eliasziw M., Tough S.C., Hanley D.A. Meta-analysis of the effect of the acid-ash hypothesis of osteoporosis on calcium balance. J Bone Miner Res 2009;24(11):1835-40. doi:10.1359/jbmr.090515

Fenton T.R., Lyon A.W., Eliasziw M., Tough S.C., Hanley D.A. Phosphate decreases urine calcium and increases calcium balance: a meta-analysis of the osteoporosis acid-ash diet hypothesis. Nutr J 2009;8:41. doi:10.1186/1475-2891-8-41

Fenton T.R., Tough S.C., Lyon A.W., Eliasziw M., Hanley D.A. Causal assessment of dietary acid load and bone disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis applying Hill’s epidemiologic criteria for causality. Nutr J 2011;10:41. doi:10.1186/1475-2891-10-41

Schwalfenberg G.K. The alkaline diet: is there evidence that an alkaline pH diet benefits health? J Environ Public Health 2012; Article ID 727630. doi:10.1155/2012/727630

Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet, cognitive status and cognitive decline in women

Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet: Cognitive status in womenIn a large-scale prospective epidemiological study published on Journal of Nutrition a research team examined associations of long-term adherence to the Mediterranean Diet (adherence was based on intakes of: vegetables, legumes, fruits, nuts, whole grains, fish, red and processed meats, moderate alcohol, and the ratio of monounsaturated fatty acids:saturated fatty acids) and subsequent cognitive function and its decline.
The participants, 16,058 women from the Nurses’ Health Study, aged ≥70 y, underwent cognitive testing 4 times during 6 y.
The study showed that long-term Mediterranean Diet adherence was related to moderately better cognition but not with cognitive decline in this very large cohort of older women.

References

Samieri C., Okereke O.I., E. Devore E.E. and Grodstein F. Long-Term Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet Is Associated with Overall Cognitive Status, but Not Cognitive Decline, in Women. J Nutr 2013;143:493-9. doi:10.3945/jn.112.169896

How to reduce body fat

The international scientific literature is unanimous in setting the lower limit for the daily caloric intake to 1200 kcal for women and 1500 kcal for men (adults).

Body Fat
Daily Caloric Balance

To make negative the daily caloric intake, and therefore lose body weight, but expecially lose body fat, evaluation of actual caloric needs of the subject will be alongside:

  • the correct distribution of meals during the day;
  • an increased physical activity, by which the negative balance can be achieved without major sacrifices during meals.

This will make weight loss easier and protect from subsequent weight gains (body fat).
Ultimately, there must be a change in lifestyle.

CONTENTS

Lose body fat and “miracle diets”

So, the best strategy for losing body fat is not a drastic reduction in caloric intake, nor follow constrictive or “strange” diets, such as hcg diet plan, sacred heart diet, paleo diet, Master Cleanse diet (the diet that Beyonce did), etc., that require to eliminate or greatly reduce the intake of certain macronutrients, mostly carbohydrates.
Such conducts can be:

  • very stressful from psychological point of view;
  • not passable for long periods;
  • hazardous to health because of inevitable nutrient deficiencies.

Finally, they do not ensure that all the weight lost is only or almost only body fat and are often followed by substantial increases in body weight (weight cycling or yo-yo effect).
Why?

Excessive reduction of energy intake

An excessive reduction of energy intake means eating very little and this determines the risk, high, not to take adequate amounts of the various essential nutrients, that is, what we can’t synthesize, such as vitamins, certain amino acids, some fatty acids and minerals, including e.g. calcium, essential for bone metabolism at every stage of life, or iron, used in many body functions as the transport of oxygen to the tissues. This results in a depression of metabolism and hence a reduction in energy expenditure.
Whether the reduction in energy intake is excessive, or even there are periods of fasting, it adds insult to injury because a proportion of free fatty mass will be lost. How?

Reduction in energy intake and role of carbohydrates

Glucose is the only energy source for red blood cells and some brain areas, while other brain areas can also derive energy from ketone bodies, which are a product of fatty acid metabolism.
At rest, brain extracts 10% of the glucose from the bloodstream, a significant amount, about 75 mg/min., considering that its weight is about 1.5 kg. To maintain a constant glycemia, and thus ensure a constant supply of glucose to tissues, we needs to take carbohydrates or alternatively amino acids, both easily obtained from foods.
In the case of a low or absent dietary intake of carbohydrates, whereas after about 18 hours liver glycogen, which releases glucose into circulation, depletes, body synthesizes de novo glucose from certain amino acids through a process called gluconeogenesis (actually this metabolic pathway is active even after a normal meal but increases its importance in fasting).
But what’s the main source of amino acids in the body when their dietary intake is low or absent? Endogenous proteins, and there is a hierarchy in their use that is before we consume the less important and only after the most important ones. For the first digestive enzymes, pepsin, chymotrypsin, elastase, carboxypeptidase and aminopeptidase (around 35-40 g) will be used; successively liver and pancreas slow down their synthesis activities for export proteins and unused amino acids are directed to gluconeogenesis. It’s clear that these are quite modest reserves of amino acids and it is the muscle that will undertake to provide the required amounts of amino acids that is proteolysis of muscle proteins begins.
Note: Anyway, there is no absolute sequentiality in the degradation of several proteins, there is instead a plot in which, proceeding, some ways lose their importance and others will buy. So, to maintain constant glycemia the protein component of muscle is reduced, including skeletal muscle that is a tissue that represents a fairly good portion of the value of the basal metabolism and that, with exercise, can significantly increase its energy consumption: thus essential for weight loss and subsequent maintenance. It is as if the engine capacity was reduced.
One thing which we don’t think about is that heart is a muscle that may be subject to the same processes seen for skeletal muscle.
Ultimately make glucose from proteins, also food-borne, is like heat up the fire-place burning the furniture of the eighteenth century, amino acids, having available firewood, dietary carbohydrates.
Therefore, an adequate intake of carbohydrates with diet prevents excessive loss of proteins, namely, there is a saving effect of proteins played by carbohydrates.
Mammals, and therefore humans, can’t synthesize glucose from fats.

What goes in when carbohydrates goes out?

The elimination or substantial reduction in carbohydrate intake in the diet results in an increased intake of proteins, lipids, including cholesterol, because it will increase the intake of animal products, one of the main defects in hyperproteic diet.
In the body there are no amino acids reserves, thus they are metabolized and, as a byproduct of their use, ammonia is formed and it’ll be eliminated as toxic. For this reason high-protein diets imply an extra work for liver and kidneys and also for this they are not without potential health risks.
An increased fat intake often results into an increased intake of saturated fatty acids, trans fatty acids, and cholesterol, with all the consequences this may have on cardiovascular health.
What has been said so far should not induce to take large amounts of carbohydrates; this class of macronutrients should represent 55-60% of daily calories, fats 25-30% (primarily extra-virgin olive oil) and the remainder proteins: thus a composition in macronutrient that refers to prudent diet or Mediterranean Diet.

Body fat and the entry in a phase of famine/disease

A excessive reduction in caloric intake is registered by our defense mechanisms as an “entry” in a phase of famine/disease.
The abundance of food is a feature of our time, at least in industrialized countries, while our body evolved over hundreds of thousands of years during which there was no current abundance: so it’s been programmed to try to overcome with minimal damage periods of famine. If caloric intake is drastically reduced it mimics a famine: what body does is to lower consumption, lower the basal metabolism, that is, consumes less and therefore also not eating much we will not get great results. It is as if a machine is lowered the displacement, it’ll consume less (our body burns less body fat).

In summary, the best way to lose body fat, that also protects against future increases, is to make negative the daily caloric balance increasing physical activity and controlling food intake, i.e. change your own lifestyle.

References

Cereda E., Malavazos A.E., Caccialanza R., Rondanelli M., Fatati G. and Barichella M. Weight cycling is associated with body weight excess and abdominal fat accumulation: a cross-sectional study. Clin Nutr 2011;30(6):718-23. doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clnu.2011.06.009

Giampietro M. L’alimentazione per l’esercizio fisico e lo sport. Il Pensiero Scientifico Editore. Prima edizione 2005

Ravussin E., Lillioja S., Knowler W.C., Christin L., Freymond D., Abbott W.G.H., Boyce V., Howard B.V., and Bogardus C. Reduced rate of energy expenditure as a risk factor for body-weight gain. N Engl J Med 1988;318:467-72.doi:10.1056/NEJM198802253180802

Sachiko T. St. Jeor S.T. St., Howard B.V., Prewitt T.E., Bovee V., Bazzarre T., Eckel T.H., for the AHA Nutrition Committee. Dietary Protein and Weight Reduction. A Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the Nutrition Committee of the Council on Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Metabolism of the American Heart Association. Circulation 2001;104:1869-74. doi:https://doi.org/10.1161/hc4001.096152

Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease and Mediterranean Diet

Mediterranean diet and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease

Primary prevention: Walnuts and extra-virgin olive oil: healthy fats

A Spanish research team conducted a multicenter randomized trial of Mediterranean Diet pattern for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events.
The participants (7447; age range 55 to 80 years; 57% women) were with no cardiovascular disease but at high cardiovascular risk at enrollment (they had either type 2 diabetes mellitus or at least three of the following major risk factors: hypertension, smoking, overweight or obesity, elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels or a family history of premature coronary heart disease).
They were randomly assigned to one of three diets:

  • a Mediterranean Diet supplemented with mixed nuts (30 g of mixed nuts: 7.5 g of almonds, 7.5 g of hazelnuts and 15 g of walnuts);
  • a Mediterranean Diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil (≥4 tbsp/day);
  • a control diet (advice to reduce dietary fat).

It should be noted that extravirgin olive oil is the cornerstone of Mediterranean Diet.

Moreover, in comparison with those in the control group, participants in the two Mediterranean-Diet groups significantly increased weekly servings of legumes and fish. These were the only between-group differences.
No physical activity was promoted, nor total calorie restriction advised.
Participants were followed for a median of 4.8 years.
The primary end point was the rate of myocardial infarction, stroke, or death from cardiovascular causes that is the rate of major cardiovascular events.

This study have shown that among persons at high cardiovascular risk, a Mediterranean Diet supplemented with nuts or extra-virgin olive oil has proved to be effective in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease, reducing the incidence of major cardiovascular events.

References

Estruch R., Ros E., Salas-Salvadó J., et al. Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease with a Mediterranean Diet. N Engl J Med 2013. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1800389