Tag Archives: glycogen

Osmotic pressure

In solution, solvent molecules tend to move from a region of higher concentration to one of lower concentration. When two different solutions are separated by a semipermeable membrane, namely, a membrane that allows certain ions or molecules to pass, in this case the solvent molecules, a net flow of solvent molecules from the side with higher concentration to the side with lower concentration will occur. This net flow through the semipermeable membrane produces a pressure called osmotic pressure, indicated as Π, that can be defined as the force that must be applied to prevent the movement of the solvent molecules through a semipermeable membrane.
Osmotic pressure: two different solutions are separated by a semipermeable membrane

Osmotic pressure, together with boiling point elevation, freezing point depression, and vapor pressure lowering, is one of the four colligative properties of solutions, properties that do not dependent of the chemical properties of the solute particles, namely ions, molecules or supramolecular structures, but depend only on the number of solute particles present in solution.
For  a solutions of n solutes, the equation that describes osmotic pressure is the sum of the contributions of each solute:

Π = RT(i1c1 + i2c2 + … + incn)

The equation is known as the van ’t Hoff equation, where:

  • T is the absolute temperature in Kelvin;
  • R is the ideal gas constant = 8.314 J/mol K;
  • c is the molar concentration of the solute;
  • i is the van ’t Hoff factor.

CONTENTS

van ’t Hoff factor

The van ‘t Hoff factor is a measure of the degree of dissociation of solutes in solution, and is described by the equation:

i = 1 + α(n-1)

where:

  • α is the degree of dissociation of the solute molecules, equal to the ratio between the moles of the solute molecules that have dissociated and the number of the original moles, and is comprised between 0, for substances that do not ionize or dissociate in solution, and 1, for substances that completely dissociate or ionize;
  • n is the number of ions formed from the dissociation of the solute molecule.

For non ionizable compounds, such as glucose, glycogen or starch, n = 1, and i = 1.
For compounds that completely dissociate, such as strong acids and strong bases or salts, the van ‘t Hoff factor is a whole number greater than one, as α = 1 and n is equal to at least 2. For example, if we consider sodium chloride, NaCl, potassium chloride, KCl, or calcium chloride, CaCl2, in dilute solution:

NaCl → Na+ + Cl
KCl → K+ + Cl
CaCl2 → Ca2+ + 2 Cl

So in the first two cases i = 2, whereas with calcium chloride, i = 3.
Finally, for substances that do not completely ionize, such as weak acids and weak bases, i is not an integer.

The product of the van ’t Hoff factor and the molar concentration of the solute particles, ic, is the osmolarity of the solution, namely, the concentration of the solute particles osmotically active per liter of solution.

Osmotic pressure, osmosis, and plasma membranes

Osmosis can be defined as the net movement or flow of solvent molecules through a semipermeable membrane driven by osmotic pressure differences across the membrane, to try to equal the concentration of the solute on the two sides of the membrane itself.
In biological systems, water is the solvent and plasma membranes are the semipermeable membranes. Plasma membranes allow water molecules to pass, due to protein channels, known as aquaporins, as well as small non-polar molecules that diffuse rapidly across them, whereas they are impermeable to ions and macromolecules. Inside the cell there are macromolecules, such as nucleic acids, proteins, glycogen, and supramolecular aggregates, for example multienzyme complexes, but also ions in a higher concentration than that of the extracellular environment. This causes osmotic pressure to drive water from outside to inside the cell. If this net flow of water toward the inside of the cell is not counterbalanced, cell swells, and plasma membrane is distended until the cell bursts, that is, an osmotic lysis occurs. Under physiological conditions, this does not happen because during evolution several mechanisms have been developed to oppose, and in some cases even exploit, these osmotic forces. Two of these are energy-dependent ion pumps and, in plants, bacteria and fungi, the cell wall.

Energy dependent ion pumps

Ion pumps reduce, at the expense of ATP, the intracellular concentrations of specific ions with respect to their concentrations in the extracellular environment, thereby creating an unequal distribution of the ions across the plasma membrane, namely, an ion gradient. In this way the cell counterbalances the osmotic forces due to the ions and macromolecules trapped inside it. An example of energy-dependent ion pump is Na+/K+ ATPase, which reduces the concentration of Na+ inside the cell relative to the outside.

Cell wall

Plant cells are surrounded by an extracellular matrix, the cell wall, that, being non expandable and positioned next to the plasma membrane, allows cell to resist osmotic forces that would cause its swelling and finally the lysis. How? Inside mature plant cells, the vacuoles are the largest organelles, occupying about 80% of the total cell volume. Large quantities of solutes, for the most part organic and inorganic acids, are accumulated within them and osmotically draw water, causing their swelling. In turn, this causes the tonoplast, the membrane that surrounds the vacuole, to press the plasma membrane against the cell wall, that mechanically opposes to these forces and avoids the osmotic lysis. This osmotic pressure is called turgor pressure, and can reach up 2 MPa, that is, 20 atmospheres, a value about 10 times higher than the air pressure in tires. It is responsible for the rigidity of non woody parts of plants, is involved in plant growth, as well as in:

  • wilting of vegetables, due to its reduction;
  • plants movements, such as:
    • the circadian movements of the leaves;
    • the movements of the leaves of Dionaea muscipula, the Venus flytrap, or of the leaves of the sensitive plants such as Mimosa pudica.

Even in bacteria and fungi, the plasma membrane is surrounded by a cell wall that stably withholds the internal pressure, then preventing osmotic lysis of the cell.

Isotonic, hypotonic, and hypertonic solutions

By comparing the osmotic pressure of two solutions separated by a semipermeable membrane, it is possible to define three types of solutions, briefly described below.

  • The solutions are isotonic when they have the same osmotic pressure.
  • If the solutions have different osmotic pressures, that with the higher osmotic pressure is defined hypertonic with respect to the other.
  • If the solutions have different osmotic pressures, that with the lower osmotic pressure is defined hypotonic with respect to the other.

In biological systems, the cytosol is the reference solution; then, if we place a cell in a:

  • isotonic solution, no net flow of water occurs into or out of the plasma membrane;
  • hypertonic solution, there is a net flow of water out of the cell, therefore the cell loses water and shrinks;
  • hypotonic solution, there is a net flow of water into the cell, the cell swells and can burst, i.e., an osmotic lysis can occur.

In addition to ion pumps and the cell wall, in the course of evolution multicellular organisms have developed another mechanism to oppose the osmotic forces: to surround the cells with an isotonic solution or close to isotonicity that prevents, or at least limits, a net inflow or outflow of water. An example is plasma, that is, the liquid component of blood, which, due to the presence of salts and proteins, primarily albumin in humans, has an osmolarity similar to that of the cytosol.

Osmotic pressure, starch and glycogen

Living organisms store glucose in the form of polymers, glycogen in animals, fungi, bacteria, and starch in photoautotrophs, but not in the free form. In this way they avoid that the osmotic pressure exerted by the carbohydrate stores becomes too high. Indeed, since osmotic pressure, like the other colligative properties, depends only on the number of solute molecules, storing millions of glucose units in the form of a significantly lower number of polysaccharides allows to avoid an excessive pressure. Here are some examples.

  • A gram of polysaccharide, e.g. glycogen or starch, composed of 1000 glucose units has an effect on osmotic pressure lower than that of a milligram of free glucose.
  • In hepatocyte, if the glucose stored in the form of glycogen was present in the free form, its concentration would be about 0.4 M, whereas the polysaccharide concentration of about 0.04 μM, and this would cause a net flow of water inside the cell such as to lead to osmotic lysis.
    Furthermore, even if osmotic lysis could be avoided, there would be problems with the transport of glucose into the cell. In humans, under physiological conditions, the blood glucose concentration ranges from 3.33 to 5.56 mmol/L (60-100 mg/dL); if glucose was present in the free form, its intracellular concentration would be 120 to 72 times greater than that of the blood, and its transport into the hepatocyte would entail a large energy expenditure.

References

Beauzamy L., Nakayama N., and Boudaoud A. Flowers under pressure: ins and outs of turgor regulation in development. Ann Bot 2014;114(7):1517-33. doi:10.1093/aob/mcu187

Berg J.M., Tymoczko J.L., and Stryer L. Biochemistry. 5th Edition. W. H. Freeman and Company, 2002

Garrett R.H., Grisham C.M. Biochemistry. 4th Edition. Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning, 2010

Heldt H-W. Plant biochemistry – 3th Edition. Elsevier Academic Press, 2005

Michal G., Schomburg D. Biochemical pathways. An atlas of biochemistry and molecular biology. 2nd Edition. John Wiley J. & Sons, Inc. 2012

Moran L.A., Horton H.R., Scrimgeour K.G., Perry M.D. Principles of Biochemistry. 5th Edition. Pearson, 2012

Nelson D.L., Cox M.M. Lehninger. Principles of biochemistry. 6th Edition. W.H. Freeman and Company, 2012

Prolonged exercise and carbohydrates

During prolonged exercise (>90 min), like marathon, Ironman, cross-country skiing, road cycling or open water swimming, the effects of supplementary carbohydrates on performance are mainly metabolic rather than central and include:

  • the provision of an additional muscle fuel source when glycogen stores become depleted;
  • muscle glycogen sparing;
  • the prevention of low blood glucose concentrations.

How many carbohydrates should an athlete take?

The optimal amount of ingested carbohydrate is that which results in the maximal rate of exogenous carbohydrate oxidation without causing gastrointestinal discomfort”. (Jeukendrup A.E., 2008, see References).

Prolonged exercise: which carbohydrates should an athlete take?

Until 2004 it was believed that carbohydrates ingested during exercise (also prolonged exercise) could be oxidized at a rate no higher than 1 g/min, that is, 60 g/h, independent of the type of carbohydrate.
Exogenous carbohydrate oxidation is limited by their intestinal absorption and the ingestion of more than around 60 g/min of a single type of carbohydrate will not increase carbohydrate oxidation rate but it is likely to be associated with gastrointestinal discomfort (see later).
Why?
At intestinal level, the passage of glucose (and galactose) is mediated by a sodium dependent transporter called SGLT1. This transporter becomes saturated at a carbohydrate intake about 60 g/h and this (and/or glucose disposal by the liver that regulates its transport into the bloodstream) limits the oxidation rate to 1g/min or 60 g/h. For this reason, also when glucose is ingested at very high rate (>60 g/h), exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rates higher 1.0-1.1 g/min are not observed.

The rate of oxidation of ingested maltose, sucrose, maltodextrins and glucose polymer is fairly similar to that of ingested glucose.

Fructose uses a different sodium independent transporter called GLUT5. Compared with glucose, fructose has, like galactose, a lower oxidation rate, probably due to its lower rate of intestinal absorption and the need to be converted into glucose in the liver, again like galactose, before it can be oxidized.
However, if the athlete ingests different types of carbohydrates, which use different intestinal transporters, exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rate can increase significantly.
It seems that the best mixture is maltodextrins and fructose.

Note: the high rates of carbohydrate ingestion may be associated with delayed gastric emptying and fluid absorption; this can be minimized by ingesting combinations of multiple transportable carbohydrates that enhance fluid delivery compared with a single carbohydrate. This also causes relatively little gastrointestinal distress.

Conclusion

The ingestion of different types of carbohydrates that use different intestinal transporters can:

  • increase total carbohydrate absorption;
  • increase exogenous carbohydrate oxidation;
  • improve performance.
References

Burke L.M., Hawley J.A., Wong S.H.S., & Jeukendrup A. Carbohydrates for training and competition. J Sport Sci 2011;29:Sup1,S17-S27. doi:10.1080/02640414.2011.585473

Jentjens R.L.P.G., Moseley L., Waring R.H., Harding L.K., and Jeukendrup A.E. Oxidation of combined ingestion of glucose and fructose during exercise. J Appl Physiol 2004:96;1277-1284. doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.00974.2003

Jentjens R.L.P.G., Venables M.C., and Jeukendrup A.E. Oxidation of exogenous glucose, sucrose, and maltose during prolonged cycling exercise. J Appl Physiol 2004:96;1285-1291. doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.01023.2003

Jeukendrup A.E. Carbohydrate feeding during exercise. Eur J Sport Sci 2008:2;77-86. doi:10.1080/17461390801918971

Jeukendrup A.E. Nutrition for endurance sports: marathon, triathlon, and road cycling. J Sport Sci 2011:29;sup1, S91-S99. doi:10.1080/02640414.2011.610348

Mahan L.K., Escott-Stump S.: “Krause’s foods, nutrition, and diet therapy” 10th ed. 2000

Shils M.E., Olson J.A., Shike M., Ross A.C.: “Modern nutrition in health and disease” 9th ed. 1999

Carbohydrate ingestion during short duration high intensity exercise

High Intensity: During-Exercise Nutrition
Fig. 1- During-Exercise Nutrition

Carbohydrate ingestion during intermittent high intensity or prolonged (>90 min) sub-maximal exercise can:

  • increase exercise capacity;
  • improve exercise performance;
  • postpone fatigue.

The intake of very small amounts of carbohydrates or carbohydrate mouth rinsing (for example with a 6% maltodextrin solution) may improve exercise performance by 2-3% when the exercise is of relatively short duration (<1 h) and high intensity (>75% VO2max), that is, an exercise not limited by the availability of muscle glycogen stores, given adequate diet.
The underlying mechanisms for the ergogenic effect of carbohydrates during this type of activity are not metabolic but may reside in the central nervous system: it seems that carbohydrates are detected in the oral cavity by unidentified receptors, promoting an enhanced sense of well-being and improving pacing.
These effects are independent of taste or sweet and non-sweet of carbohydrates but are specific to carbohydrates.

It should be noted that performance effects with drink ingestion are similar to the mouth rinse; therefore athletes, when they don’t complain of gastrointestinal distress when ingesting too much fluid, may have an advantage taking the drink (in endurance sports, dehydration and carbohydrate depletion are the most likely contributors to fatigue).

Conclusion
It seems that during exercise of relatively short duration (<1 h) and high intensity (>75% VO2max) it is not necessary to ingest large amounts of carbohydrates: a carbohydrate mouth rinsing or the intake of very small amounts of carbohydrates may be sufficient to obtain a performance benefit.

References

Burke L.M., Hawley J.A., Wong S.H.S., & Jeukendrup A. Carbohydrates for training and competition. J Sport Sci 2011;29:Sup1,S17-S27. doi:10.1080/02640414.2011.585473

Jentjens R.L.P.G., Moseley L., Waring R.H., Harding L.K., and Jeukendrup A.E. Oxidation of combined ingestion of glucose and fructose during exercise. J Appl Physiol 2004:96;1277-1284. doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.00974.2003

Jentjens R.L.P.G., Venables M.C., and Jeukendrup A.E. Oxidation of exogenous glucose, sucrose, and maltose during prolonged cycling exercise. J Appl Physiol 2004:96;1285-1291. doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.01023.2003

Jeukendrup A.E. Carbohydrate feeding during exercise. Eur J Sport Sci 2008:2;77-86. doi:10.1080/17461390801918971

Mahan L.K., Escott-Stump S.: “Krause’s foods, nutrition, and diet therapy” 10th ed. 2000

Shils M.E., Olson J.A., Shike M., Ross A.C.: “Modern nutrition in health and disease” 9th ed. 1999

Carbohydrate loading before competition

Carbohydrate loading is a good strategy to increase fuel stores in muscles before the start of the competition.

What does the muscle “eat” during endurance exercise?

Carbohydrate loading: Alberto Sordi and SpaghettiMuscle “eats” carbohydrates, in the form of glycogen, stored in the muscles and liver, carbohydrates ingested during the exercise or just before that, and fat.

During endurance exercise, the most likely contributors to fatigue are dehydration and carbohydrate depletion, especially of muscle and liver glycogen.
To prevent the “crisis” due to the depletion of muscle and liver carbohydrates, it is essential having high glycogen stores before the start of the activity.

What does affect glycogen stores?

  • The diet in the days before the competition.
  • The level of training (well-trained athletes synthesize more glycogen and have potentially higher stores, because they have more efficient enzymes).
  • The activity in the day of the competition and the days before (if muscle doesn’t work it doesn’t lose glycogen). Therefore, it is better to do light trainings in the days before the competition, not to deplete glycogen stores, and to take care of nutrition.

The “Swedish origin” of carbohydrate loading

Very high muscle glycogen levels (the so-called glycogen supercompensation) can improve performance, i.e. time to complete a predetermined distance, by 2-3% in the events lasting more than 90 minutes, compared with low to normal glycogen, while benefits seem to be little or absent when the duration of the event is less than 90 min.
Well-trained athletes can achieve glycogen supercompensation without the depletion phase prior to carbohydrate loading, the old technique discovered by two Swedish researchers, Saltin and Hermansen, in 1960s.
The researchers discovered that muscle glycogen concentration could be doubled in the six days before the competition following this diet:

  • three days of low carb menu (a nutritional plan very poor in carbohydrates, i.e. without pasta, rice, bread, potatoes, legumes, fruits etc.);
  • three days of high carbohydrate diet, the so-called carbohydrate loading (a nutritional plan very rich in carbohydrates).

This diet causes a lot of problems: the first three days are very hard and there may be symptoms similar to depression due to low glucose delivery to brain, and the benefits are few.
Moreover, with the current training techniques, the type and amount of work done, we can indeed obtain high levels of glycogen: above 2.5 g/kg of body weight.

The “corrent” carbohydrate loading

If we compete on Sunday, a possible training/nutritional plan to obtain supercompensation of glycogen stores can be the following:

  • Wednesday, namely four days before the competition, moderate training and then dinner without carbohydrates;
  • from Thursday on, namely the three days before the competition, hyperglucidic diet and light trainings.
Carbohydrate Loading
Fig. 1 – Carbohydrate Loading: 2500 kcal Diet

The amount of dietary carbohydrates needed to recover glycogen stores or to promote glycogen loading depends on the duration and intensity of the training programme, and they span from 5 to 12 g/kg of body weight/d, depending on the athlete and his activity. With higher carbohydrate intake you can achieve higher glycogen stores but this does not always results in better performance; moreover, it should be noted that glycogen storage is associated with weight gain due to water retention (approximately 3 g per gram of glycogen), and this may not be desirable in some sports.

References

Burke L.M., Hawley J.A., Wong S.H.S., & Jeukendrup A. Carbohydrates for training and competition. J Sport Sci 2011;29:Sup1,S17-S27. doi:10.1080/02640414.2011.585473

Hargreaves M., Hawley J.A., & Jeukendrup A.E. Pre-exercise carbohydrate and fat ingestion: effects on metabolism and performance. J Sport Sci 2004;22:31-38. doi10.1080/0264041031000140536

Jeukendrup A.E., C. Killer S.C. The myths surrounding pre-exercise carbohydrate feeding. Ann Nutr Metab 2010;57(suppl 2):18-25. doi:10.1159/000322698

Mahan L.K., Escott-Stump S.: “Krause’s foods, nutrition, and diet therapy” 10th ed. 2000

Moseley L., Lancaster G.I, Jeukendrup A.E. Effects of timing of pre-exercise ingestion of carbohydrate on subsequent metabolism and cycling performance. Eur J Appl Physiol 2003;88:453-8. doi:10.1007/s00421-002-0728-8

Shils M.E., Olson J.A., Shike M., Ross A.C.: “Modern nutrition in health and disease” 9th ed. 1999

Endurance sports and nutrition

In the last years endurance sports, defined in the PASSCLAIM document of the European Commission as those lasting 30 min or more, are increasing in popularity and competitions as half marathons, marathons, even ultramarathons, half Ironmans, or Ironman competitions attract more and more people.
They are competitions which can last hours, or days in the more extreme case of ultramarathons.
Athletes at all levels should take care of training and nutrition to optimize performance and to avoid potential health threats.
In endurance sports the most likely contributors to fatigue are dehydration and carbohydrate depletion (especially liver and muscle glycogen).

Dehydration and endurance sports

Dehydration is due to sweat losses needed to dissipate the heat that is generated during exercise. To prevent the onset of fatigue from this cause, the nutritional target is to reduce sweat losses to less than 2–3% of body weight; it is equally important to avoid drinking in excess of sweating rate, especially low sodium drinks, to prevent hyponatraemia (low serum sodium levels).

Glycogen depletion

Muscle glycogen and blood glucose are the most important substrates from which muscle obtains the energy needed for contraction.
Fatigue during prolonged exercise is often associated with reduced blood glucose levels and muscle glycogen depletion; therefore, it is essential starting exercise/competition with high pre-exercise muscle and liver glycogen concentrations, the last one for the maintaining of normal blood glucose levels.

Other problems which reduce performance and can be an health threat of the athlete, especially in long-distance races, are gastrointestinal problems, hyperthermia and hyponatraemia.
Hyponatraemia has occasionally been reported, especially among slower competitors with very high intakes of low sodium drinks.
Gastrointestinal problems occur frequently, especially in long-distance races; both genetic predisposition and the intake of highly concentrated carbohydrate solutions, hyperosmotic drinks, as well as the intake of fibre, fats, and proteins seem to be important in their occurrence.

References

Burke L.M., Hawley J.A., Wong S.H.S., & Jeukendrup A. Carbohydrates for training and competition. J Sport Sci 2011;29:Sup1,S17-S27. doi:10.1080/02640414.2011.585473

Saris W.H., Antoine J.M., Brouns F., Fogelholm M., Gleeson M., Hespel P., Jeukendrup A.E., Maughan R.J., Pannemans D., Stich V. PASSCLAIM – Physical performance and fitness. Eur J Nutr. 2003;42(Suppl 1):i50-i95. doi:10.1007/s00394-003-1104-0

Jeukendrup A.E. Carbohydrate feeding during exercise. Eur J Sport Sci 2008:2;77-86. doi:10.1080/17461390801918971

Jeukendrup A.E. Nutrition for endurance sports: marathon, triathlon, and road cycling. J Sport Sci 2011:29;sup1, S91-S99. doi:10.1080/02640414.2011.610348

Mahan L.K., Escott-Stump S.: “Krause’s foods, nutrition, and diet therapy” 10th ed. 2000

Sawka M.N., Burke L.M., Eichner E.R., Maughan, R.J., Montain S.J., Stachenfeld N.S. American College of Sports Medicine position stand: exercise and fluid replacement. Med Sci Sport Exercise 2007;39:377-390. doi:10.1249/mss.0b013e31802ca597

Shils M.E., Olson J.A., Shike M., Ross A.C.: “Modern nutrition in health and disease” 9th ed. 1999

Shirreffs S., Sawka M.N. Fluid and electrolyte needs for training, competition and recovery. J Sport Sci 2011;29:sup1, S39-S46. doi:10.1080/02640414.2011.614269

Blood glucose levels: the role of the liver and glucose-6-phosphatase

One of the main functions of the liver is to participate in the maintaining of blood glucose levels within well defined range (in the healthy state before meals 60-100 mg/dL or 3.33-5.56 mmol/L). To do it the liver releases glucose into the bloodstream in:

  • fasting state;
  • between meals;
  • during physical activity.

Blood glucose levels and hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase

In the liver, glycogen is the storage form of glucose which is released from the molecule not as such, but in the phosphorylated form i.e. with charge, the glucose-1-phosphate (this process is called glycogenolysis). The phosphorylated molecule can’t freely diffuse from the cell, but in the liver it is present the enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase that hydrolyzes glucose-6-phosphate, produced from glucose-1-phosphate in the reaction catalyzed by phosphoglucomutase, to glucose (an irreversible dephosphorylation).

glycogen(n glucose residues) + Pi → glucose-1-phosphate + glycogen(n-1 glucose residues)

glucose-1-phosphate ↔ glucose-6-phosphate

glucose-6-phosphate + H2O → glucose + Pi

Then, glucose can diffuse from the hepatocyte, via a transporter into the plasma membrane called GLUT2, into the bloodstream to be delivered to extra-hepatic cells, in primis neurons and red blood cells for which it is the main, and for red blood cells the only energy source (neurons, with the exception of those in some brain areas that can use only glucose as energy source, can derive energy from another source, the ketone bodies, which becomes predominant during periods of prolonged fasting).

Note: the liver obtains most of the energy required from the oxidation of fatty acids , not from glucose.
Glucose-6-phosphatase is present also in the kidney and gut but not in the muscle and brain; therefore in these tissues glucose-6-phosphate can’t be released from the cell.
Glucose-6-phosphatase plays an important role also in gluconeogenesis.

Glucose-6-phosphatase is present into the membrane of endoplasmic reticulum and the hydrolysis of glucose-6-phosphate occurs into its lumen (therefore this reaction is separated from the process of glycolysis). The presence of a specific transporter, the glucose-6-phosphate translocase, is required to transport the phosphorylated molecule from citosol into the lumen of endoplasmic reticulum. Although a glucose transporter is present into the membrane of endoplasmic reticulum, most of the released glucose is not transported back into the cytosol of the cell but is secreted into the bloodstream. Finally, an ion transporter transports back into the cytosol the inorganic phosphate released into the endoplasmic reticulum.

References

Arienti G. “Le basi molecolari della nutrizione”. Seconda edizione. Piccin, 2003

Cozzani I. and Dainese E. “Biochimica degli alimenti e della nutrizione”. Piccin Editore, 2006

Mahan LK, Escott-Stump S.: “Krause’s foods, nutrition, and diet therapy” 10th ed. 2000

Mariani Costantini A., Cannella C., Tomassi G. “Fondamenti di nutrizione umana”. 1th ed. Il Pensiero Scientifico Editore, 1999

Nelson D.L., M. M. Cox M.M. Lehninger. Principles of biochemistry. 4th Edition. W.H. Freeman and Company, 2004

Stipanuk M.H., Caudill M.A. Biochemical, physiological, and molecular aspects of human nutrition. 3rd Edition. Elsevier health sciences, 2013 [Google eBooks]

Strategies to maximize muscle glycogen resynthesis after exercise

An important energy source for working muscle is its glycogen store, whose level is correlated with the onset of fatigue.
The highly trained athlete not only has glycogen stores potentially higher but he is also able to synthesize it faster thanks to more efficient enzymes.

Glycogen
Fig. 1 – Glycogen Structure

To synthesize glycogen it is necessary to ingest carbohydrates; but how many, which, when, and how often?

CONTENTS

The two phases of muscle glycogen synthesis after exercise

In order to restore as quickly as possible muscle glycogen depots, it is useful to know that, as a result of training sessions that deplete muscle glycogen to values below 75% those at rest and not fasting, glycogen synthesis occurs in two phases.
To know and therefore take advantage of the biphasicity is important for those athletes who are engaged in more daily training sessions, or who otherwise have little time for recovery between a high intensity exercise and the subsequent one (less than 8 hours), in order to maximize glycogen synthesis and achieve the optimal performance during a second close exercise session.
The two phases are characterized by:

  • a different sensitivity to circulating insulin levels;
  • a different velocity.

The first phase

The first phase, immediately following the end of an activity and lasting 30-60 minutes, is insulin-independent, i.e. glucose uptake by muscle cell as glycogen synthesis are independent from hormone action.
This phase is characterized by an elevated rate of synthesis that however decreases rapidly if you do not take in carbohydrates: the maximum rate is in the first 30 minutes, then declines to about one fifth in 60 minutes, and to about one ninth in 120 minutes from the end of exercise.
How is it possible to take advantage of this first phase to replenish muscle glycogen stores as much as possible? By making sure that the greatest possible amount of glucose arrives to muscle in the phase immediately following to the end of exercise, best if done within the first 30 minutes.

  • What to ingest?
    High glycemic index, but easy to digest and absorb, carbohydrates.
    Therefore, it is advisable to replace foods, even though of high glycemic index, that need some time for digestion and the subsequent absorption, with solutions/gel containing for example glucose and/or sucrose. These solutions ensure the maximal possible absorption rate and resupply of glucose to muscle because of they contain only glucose and are without fiber or anything else that could slow their digestion and the following absorption of the monosaccharide, that is, they are capable of producing high blood glucose levels in a relatively short time.
    It is also possible to play on temperature and concentration of the solution to accelerate the gastric transit.
    It should be further underlined that the use of these carbohydrate solutions is recommended only when the recovery time from a training/competition session causing significant depletion of muscle glycogen and the following one is short, less than 8 hours.
  • How many carbohydrates do you need?
    Many studies has been conducted to find the ideal amount of carbohydrates to ingest.
    If in post-exercise the athlete does not eat, glycogen synthesis rate is very low, while if he ingests adequate amounts of carbohydrates immediately after cessation of exercise, synthesis rate can reach a value over 20 times higher.
    From the analysis of scientific literature it seems reasonable to state that, as a result of training sessions that deplete muscle glycogen stores as seen above (<75% of those at rest and not fasting), the maximum synthesis rate is obtained by carbohydrate intake, with high glycemic index and high digestion and absorption rates, equal to about 1.2 g/kg of body weight/h for the next 4-5 hours from the end of exercise.
    In this way, the amount of glycogen produced is higher than 150% compared to the ingestion of 0.8 g/kg/h.
    Because further increases, up to 1.6 g/kg/h, do not lead to further rise in glycogen synthesis rate, the carbohydrate amount equal to 1.2 g/kg/h can be considered optimum to maximize the resynthesis rate of muscle glycogen stores during post-exercise.
  • And the frequency of carbohydrate ingestion?
    It was observed that if carbohydrates are ingested frequently, every 15-30 minutes, it seems there is a further stimulation of muscle glucose uptake as of muscle glycogen replenishment compared with ingestion at 2-hours intervals. Particularly, ingestions in the first post-exercise hours seem to optimize glycogen levels.

The second phase

The second phase begins from the end of the first, lasts until the start of the last meal before the next exercise (hence, from several hours to days), and is insulin-dependent i.e. muscle glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis are sensitive to circulating hormone levels.
Moreover, you observe a significant reduction in muscle glycogen synthesis rate: with adequate carbohydrate intake the synthesis rate is at a value of about 10-30% lower than that observed during the first phase.
This phase can last for several hours, but tends to be shorter if:

  • carbohydrate intake is high;
  • glycogen synthesis is more active;
  • muscle glycogen levels are increased.

In order to optimize the resynthesis rate of glycogen, experimental data indicate that meals with high glycemic index carbohydrates are more effective than those with low glycemic index carbohydrates; but if between a training/competition session and the subsequent one days and not hours spend, the evidences do not favor high glycemic index carbohydrates as compared to low glycemic index ones as long as an adequate amount is taken in.

Muscle glycogen synthesis rate and ingestion of carbohydrates and proteins

The combined ingestion of carbohydrates and proteins (or free insulinotropic amino acids) allows to obtain post-exercise glycogen synthesis rate that does not significantly differ from that obtained with larger amounts of carbohydrates alone. This could be an advantage for the athlete who may ingest smaller amount of carbohydrates, therefore reducing possible gastrointestinal complications commons during training/competition afterward to their great consumption.
From the analysis of scientific literature it seems reasonable to affirm that, after an exercise that depletes at least 75% of muscle glycogen stores, you can obtain a glycogen synthesis rate similar to that reached with 1.2 g/kg/h of carbohydrates alone (the maximum obtainable) with the coingestion of 0.8 g/kg/h of carbohydrates and 0.4 g/kg /h of proteins, maintaining the same frequency of ingestion, therefore every 15-30 minutes during the first 4-5 hours of post-exercise.

The two phases: molecular mechanisms

The biphasicity is consequence, in both phases, of an increase in:

  • glucose transport rate into cell;
  • the activity of glycogen synthase, the enzyme that catalyzes glycogen synthesis.

However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these changes are different.
In the first phase, the increase in glucose transport rate, independent from insulin presence, is mediated by the translocation, induced by the contraction, of glucose transporters, called GLUT4, on the cytoplasmatic membrane of the muscle cell.
In addition, the low glycogen levels also stimulate glucose transport as it is believed that a large portion of transporter-containing vesicles are bound to glycogen, and therefore they may become available when its levels are depleted.
Finally, the low muscle glycogen levels stimulate glycogen synthase activity too: it has been demonstrated that these levels are a regulator of enzyme activity far more potent than insulin.
In the second phase, the increase in muscle glycogen synthesis is due to insulin action on glucose transporters and on glycogen synthase activity of muscle cell. This sensibility to the action of circulating insulin, that can persist up to 48 hours, depending on carbohydrate intake and the amount of resynthesized muscle glycogen, has attracted much attention: it is in fact possible, through appropriate nutritional intervention, to increase the secretion in order to improve glycogen synthesis itself, but also protein anabolism, reducing at the same time the protein-breakdown rate.

Glycogen synthesis rate and insulin

The coingestion of carbohydrates and proteins (or free amino acids) increases postprandial insulin secretion compared to carbohydrates alone (in some studies there was an increase in hormone secretion 2-3 times higher compared to carbohydrates alone).
It was speculated that, thanks to the higher circulating insulin concentrations, further increases in post-exercise glycogen synthesis rate could be obtained compared to those observed with carbohydrates alone, but in reality it does not seem so. In fact, if carbohydrate intake is increased to 1.2 g/kg/h plus 0.4 g/kg/h of proteins no further increases in glycogen synthesis rate are observed if compared to those obtained with the ingestion of carbohydrates alone in the same amount (1,2 g/kg/h, that, as mentioned above, like the coingestion of 0,8 g/kg/h of carbohydrates and 0,4 g/kg/h of proteins, allows to attain the maximum achievable rate in post-exercise) or in isoenergetic quantities, that is, 1.6 g/kg (proteins and carbohydrates contain the same calorie/g)

Insulin and preferential carbohydrate storage

The greater circulating insulin levels reached with the coingestion of carbohydrates and proteins (or free amino acids) might stimulate the accumulation of ingested carbohydrates in tissues most sensitive to its action, such as liver and previously worked muscle, thus resulting in a more efficient storage, for the purposes of sport activity, of the same carbohydrates.

References

Beelen M., Burke L.M., Gibala M.J., van Loon J.C. Nutritional strategies to promote postexercise recovery. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab 2010:20(6);515-32 doi:10.1123/ijsnem.20.6.515

Berardi J.M., Noreen E.E., Lemon P.W.R. Recovery from a cycling time trial is enhanced with carbohydrate-protein supplementation vs. isoenergetic carbohydrate supplementation. J Intern Soc Sports Nutrition 2008;5:24 doi:10.1186/1550-2783-5-24

Betts J., Williams C., Duffy K., Gunner F. The influence of carbohydrate and protein ingestion during recovery from prolonged exercise on subsequent endurance performance. J Sports Sciences 2007;25(13):1449-60 doi:10.1080/02640410701213459

Howarth K.R., Moreau N.A., Phillips S.M., and Gibala M.J. Coingestion of protein with carbohydrate during recovery from endurance exercise stimulates skeletal muscle protein synthesis in humans. J Appl Physiol 2009:106;1394–1402 doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.90333.2008

Jentjens R., Jeukendrup A. E. Determinants of post-exercise glycogen synthesis during short-term recovery. Sports Medicine 2003:33(2);117-144 doi:10.2165/00007256-200333020-00004

Millard-Stafford M., Childers W.L., Conger S.A., Kampfer A.J., Rahnert J.A. Recovery nutrition: timing and composition after endurance exercise. Curr Sports Med Rep 2008;7(4):193-201 doi:10.1249/JSR.0b013e31817fc0fd

Price T.B., Rothman D.L., Taylor R., Avison M.J., Shulman G.I., Shulman R.G. Human muscle glycogen resynthesis after exercise: insulin-dependent and –independent phases. J App Physiol 1994:76(1);104–111 doi:10.1152/jappl.1994.76.1.104

van Loon L.J.C., Saris W.H.M., Kruijshoop M., Wagenmakers A.J.M. Maximizing postexercise muscle glycogen synthesis: carbohydrate supplementation and the application of amino acid or protein hydrolysate mixtures. Am J Clin Nutr 2000;72: 106-111 doi:10.1093/ajcn/72.1.106

Skeletal muscle glycogen stores and sports

Muscle glycogen represents a source of glucose, therefore energy, that can be used by muscle during physical activity: it is an energy store where needed!
Furthermore a close relationship exists between the onset of fatigue and depletion of its muscle stores.

Glycogen as energy source

Carbohydrates and fatty acids represent the main energy source for muscle during exercise and their relative contribution varies depending on:

  • the intensity and duration of exercise;
  • the level of training.

Skeletal Muscle GlycogenIf for fatty acids there are no problems regarding body stores so it is not for carbohydrates whose stores, present in glycogen form principally in the liver and the muscle, are modest, less than 5% of total body energy stores: in a non-fasting 70 kg adult male there are about 250 g of glycogen in the muscle and 100 g in the liver, for a total energy of about 1400 kcal. In athletes the amount could be higher, for example in the best marathoners, again considering an adult male as above, you can reach up to 475 g in total, muscle plus liver, which corresponds to about 1900 kcal.
In spite of this, glycogen contribution to the total energy needed to sustain muscular workload rises with the increase of exercise intensity, whereas we reduce that in the form of fatty acids.
Furthermore, in the absence of replenishment with exogenous carbohydrates, performance is determined by the endogenous stores of liver and skeletal muscle glycogen, of which relative consumption is different: an increase of intensity increases that of the second (muscle) while remain more or less constant in that of the first (liver).

Skeletal muscle glycogen and intese exercises

In fact, skeletal muscle glycogen represents the most important energy reserve for prolonged moderate-high intensity exercise, an importance that increase in the case of high-intensity interval exercise (common in training session undertaken by swimmers runners, rowers or in team-sport players) or in resistance exercise, therefore both endurance and resistance exercises. If for example we consider the marathon about 80% of utilized energy derives from carbohydrate oxidation, for the most part skeletal muscle glycogen.
Finally, the replenishment rate of glycogen stores in post-exercise is one of the most important factors in establishing necessary recovery time.

Muscle glycogen and fatigue

Fatigue and low glycogen levels are closely correlate but it is not clear which mechanisms are at the basis of this relationship; one hypothesis is that there exists a minimum glycogen concentration that is “protected” and is resistant to being used during exercise, perhaps to ensure an energy reserve in case of extreme necessity.
Because of the closely relationship between skeletal muscle glycogen depletion and fatigue, its replenish rate in the post-exercise is one of the most important factors in determining necessary recovery time.

References

Arienti G. “Le basi molecolari della nutrizione”. Seconda edizione. Piccin, 2003

Beelen M., Burke L.M., Gibala M.J., van Loon J.C. Nutritional strategies to promote postexercise recovery. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab 2010:20(6);515-32 doi:10.1123/ijsnem.20.6.515

Cozzani I. and Dainese E. “Biochimica degli alimenti e della nutrizione”. Piccin Editore, 2006

Giampietro M. “L’alimentazione per l’esercizio fisico e lo sport”. Il Pensiero Scientifico Editore, 2005

Mahan LK, Escott-Stump S.: “Krause’s foods, nutrition, and diet therapy” 10th ed. 2000

Mariani Costantini A., Cannella C., Tomassi G. “Fondamenti di nutrizione umana”. 1th ed. Il Pensiero Scientifico Editore, 1999

Nelson D.L., M. M. Cox M.M. Lehninger. Principles of biochemistry. 4th Edition. W.H. Freeman and Company, 2004

Stipanuk M.H., Caudill M.A. Biochemical, physiological, and molecular aspects of human nutrition. 3rd Edition. Elsevier health sciences, 2013 [Google eBooks]