Tag Archives: maltodextrins

Maltodextrin, fructose and endurance sports

Carbohydrate ingestion can improve endurance capacity and performance.
The ingestion of different types of carbohydrates, which use different intestinal transporters, can:

  • increase total carbohydrate absorption;
  • increase exogenous carbohydrate oxidation;
  • and therefore improve performance.

Glucose and fructose

When a mixture of glucose and fructose is ingested (in the analyzed literature, respectively 1.2 and 0.6 g/min, ratio 2:1, for total carbohydrate intake rate to 1.8 g/min), there is less competition for intestinal absorption compared with the ingestion of an iso-energetic amount of glucose or fructose,  two different intestinal transporters being involved. Furthermore, fructose absorption is stimulated by the presence of glucose.

This can:

The combined ingestion of glucose and fructose allows to obtain exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rate around 1,26 g/min, therefore, higher than the rate reported with glucose alone (1g/min), also in high concentration.
The observed difference (+0,26 g/min) can be fully attributed to the oxidation of ingested fructose.

Sucrose and glucose

The ingestion of sucrose and glucose, in the same conditions of the ingestion of glucose and fructose (therefore, respectively 1.2 and 0.6 g/min, ratio 2:1, for total carbohydrate intake rate to 1.8 g/min), gives similar results.

Glucose, sucrose and fructose

Very high oxidation rates are found with a mixture of glucose, sucrose, and fructose (in the analyzed literature, respectively 1.2, 0.6 and 0.6 g/min, ratio 2:1:1, for total carbohydrate intake rate to 2.4 g/min; however, note the higher amounts of ingested carbohydrates).

Maltodextrin and fructose

Maltodextrin and Fructose: Oxidation of Ingested Carbohydrates
Fig. 1 – Oxidation of Ingested Carbohydrates

High oxidation rates are also observed with combinations of maltodextrin and fructose, in the same conditions of the ingestion of glucose plus fructose (therefore, respectively 1.2 and 0.6 g/min, ratio 2:1, for total carbohydrate intake rate to 1.8 g/min).

Such high oxidation rates can be achieved with carbohydrates ingested in a beverage, in a gel or in a low-fat, low protein, low-fiber energy bar.

The best combination of carbohydrates ingested during exercise seems to be the mixture of maltodextrin and fructose in a 2:1 ratio, in a 5% solution, and in a dose around 80-90 g/h.
Why?

  • This mixture has the best ratio between amount of ingested carbohydrates and their oxidation rate and it means that smaller amounts of carbohydrates remain in the stomach or gut reducing the risk of gastrointestinal complication/discomfort during prolonged exercise (see brackets grafa in the figure).
  • A solution containing a combination of multiple transportable carbohydrates and a carbohydrate content not exceeding 5% optimizes gastric emptying rate and improves fluid delivery.

Example of a 5% carbohydrate solution containing around 80-90 g of maltodextrin and fructose in a 2:1 rate; ingestion time around 1 h.

Conclusion

During prolonged exercise, when high exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rates are needed, the ingestion of multiple transportable carbohydrates is preferred above that of large amounts of a single carbohydrate.
The best mixture seems to be maltodextrin and fructose, in a 2:1 ratio, in a 5% concentration solution, and at ingestion rate of around 80-90 g/h.

References

Burke L.M., Hawley J.A., Wong S.H.S., & Jeukendrup A. Carbohydrates for training and competition. J Sport Sci 2011;29:Sup1,S17-S27. doi:10.1080/02640414.2011.585473

Jentjens R.L.P.G., Moseley L., Waring R.H., Harding L.K., and Jeukendrup A.E. Oxidation of combined ingestion of glucose and fructose during exercise. J Appl Physiol 2004:96;1277-1284. doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.00974.2003

Jentjens R.L.P.G., Venables M.C., and Jeukendrup A.E. Oxidation of exogenous glucose, sucrose, and maltose during prolonged cycling exercise. J Appl Physiol 2004:96;1285-1291. doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.01023.2003

Jeukendrup A.E. Carbohydrate feeding during exercise. Eur J Sport Sci 2008:2;77-86. doi:10.1080/17461390801918971

Jeukendrup A.E. Nutrition for endurance sports: marathon, triathlon, and road cycling. J Sport Sci 2011:29;sup1, S91-S99. doi:10.1080/02640414.2011.610348

Hypoglycemia and carbohydrate ingestion 60 min before exercise

Hypoglycemia: strategies to limit it in susceptible subjects

Hypoglycemia: Fatigue
Fig. 1 – Fatigue

From several studies it appears that the risk of developing hypoglycemia (blood glucose < 3.5 mmol /l or < 63 mg/l) is highly individual: some athletes are very prone to develop it and others are much more resistant.
A strategy to minimize glycemic and insulinemic responses during exercise is to delay carbohydrate ingestion just prior to exercise: in the last 5-15 min before exercise or during warm-up (even though followed by a short break).
Why?

  • Warm-up and then exercise increase catecholamine concentrations blunting insulin response.
  • Moreover, it has been shown that ingestion of carbohydrate-containing beverages during a warm-up (even if followed by a short break) does not lead to rebound hypoglycemia, independent of the amount of carbohydrates, but instead increases glycemia. When carbohydrates are ingested within 10 min before the onset of the exercise, exercise will start before the increase of insulin concentration.

Therefore, this timing strategy would provide carbohydrates minimizing the risk of a possible reactive hypoglycaemia.
In addition, it is possible to choose low glycemic index carbohydrates that lead to more stable glycemic and insulinemic responses during subsequent exercise.

Example: a 5-6% carbohydrate solution, often maltodextrin (i.e. 50-60 g maltodextrin in 1000 ml) or maltodextrin plus fructose (e.g. respectively 33 g plus 17 g in 1000 ml).

An intriguing observation is the lack of a clear relation between hypoglycaemia and its symptoms (likely related to a reduced delivery of glucose to the brain). In fact, symptoms are often reported in the absence of true hypoglycemia and hypoglycemia is not always associated with symptoms. Though the cause of the symptoms is still unknown, it is clearly not related to a glycemic threshold.

Conclusion

Some athletes develop symptoms similar to those of hypoglycemia, even though they aren’t always linked to actual low glycemia. To minimize these symptoms, for these subjects an individual approach is advisable. It may include:

  • carbohydrate ingestion just before the onset of exercise or during warm-up;
  • choose low-to-moderate GI carbohydrates that result in more stable glycemic and insulinemic responses;
  • or avoid carbohydrates 90 min before the onset of exercise.

References