Relationship between omega-3, omega-6 and omega-9 PUFA

Relationship between omega-3 fatty acids on functions mediated by omega-6 fatty acids

  • Impair uptake of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA).
  • Inhibit desaturases, especially Δ6 desaturase.
  • Competitively inhibit cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase.
  • Compete with omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids for acyltransferases.
  • Dilute pools of free arachidonic acid.
  • Displace arachidonic acid from specific phospholipid pools.
  • Form eicosanoid analogs with less activity or competitively bind to eicosanoid sites.
  • Alter membrane properties and associated enzyme and receptor functions.

Source: adapted from Kinsella, J.E. in Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Health and Disease, R.S. Lees and M. Karel, eds, Dekker, New York, 1990.

Relationship between ω-3 , ω-6 and ω-9 fatty acid families

Relationship between ω-3, ω-6 and ω-9 PUFA
Fig. 1 – Mackerel

The Δ5 and Δ6 desaturases prefer fatty acids with double bonds in the omega-6 or n-6 and, secondarily, the omega-3 or n-3 position of the carbon chain.
Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids family competitively suppresses, at enzymatic level, the synthesis of the omega-6  polyunsaturated fatty acids; for these reasons relative and absolute dietary intake is important in the determination of tissue omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid levels.
Both omega-3 and omega-6 families suppress the formation of the omega-9 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

References

Akoh C.C. and Min D.B. “Food lipids: chemistry, nutrition, and biotechnology” 3th ed. 2008

Bender D.A. “Benders’ dictionary of nutrition and food technology”. 2006, 8th Edition. Woodhead Publishing. Oxford

Chow Ching K. “Fatty acids in foods and their health implication” 3th ed. 2008

Mahan L.K., Escott-Stump S.: “Krause’s foods, nutrition, and diet therapy” 10th ed. 2000

Shils M.E., Olson J.A., Shike M., Ross A.C.: “Modern nutrition in health and disease” 9th ed. 1999

Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids

The synthesis of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids

Within omega-3 (ω-3) polyunsaturated fatty acid family:

are important fatty acids.

Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and α-linolenic acid

Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Omega-3 Fatty Acid Metabolism
Fig. 1 – Omega-3 Fatty Acid Metabolism

Like linoleic acid (omega-6 fatty acid), alpha-linolenic acid or ALA is a primary product of plant polyunsaturated fatty acid or PUFA synthesis and is the precursor of all the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.
It is produced de novo from linoleic acid only by plants (by the chloroplasts of marine phytoplankton and land plants) in a reaction catalyzed by Δ15-desaturase, i.e. the enzyme that forms the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid family from omega-6 one catalyzing the insertion of the double bond between carbon atoms 3 and 4, numbered from methyl end of the molecule.
Note: while many land plants lack the ability to synthesize omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, aquatic ones and planktons in colder water produce abundant amounts of them.
Animals, lacking Δ15-desaturase, can’t synthesize alpha-linolenic acid, and all the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid family de novo, and they are obliged to obtain it from plant foodstuff and/or from animals that eat them; for this reason omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are considered essential fatty acids, so called EFA.

Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids: from α-linolenic acid to EPA and DHA

Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Foods Rich in Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Fig. 2 – Foods Rich in Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Animals are able to elongate and desaturase dietary alpha-linolenic acid in a cascade of reactions to form very long polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids but terrestrial animals have limited ability to do it. The efficiency of synthesis decreases down the cascade: conversion of alpha-linolenic acid to EPA is limited (the activity of Δ6-desaturase is the rate limiting in humans) and to DHA is even more restricted than that of EPA. This metabolic pathway occurs mainly in the liver and cerebral microvasculature of the blood brain barrier, but also in the cerebral endothelium and astrocytes.

Fish and shellfish, unlike terrestrial animals, are able to convert efficiently alpha-linolenic acid, obtained from chloroplast of marine phytoplankton, in EPA and DHA (the last one is present in high concentration in many fish oils but pay attention: many fish oils are also rich in saturated fatty acids).
It should be noted that polyunsaturated fatty acids of the ω-3 family, and of any other n-families, can be interconverted by enzymatic processed only within the same family, not among families.

EPA and DHA are primarily found in marine algae (in genetically engineered algae DHA represents approximately 50% of the total fatty acids), fish, shellfish, and marine products (particularly oil from cold-water marine fish).

Some functions of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids

  • Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid are capable of increasing high-density lipoprotein (HDL), “good cholesterol”, and of interleukin-2 levels. On the other hand, they decrease the levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), “bad cholesterol“, and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL) and of interleukin-1 levels.
  • They are essential for the normal functioning of the brain and retina, especially in premature borns.
  • They are essential for growth and development throughout the life; for example if in children diet there is not enough omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids they may suffer dermatitis, growth retardation, neurological and visual disturbances.
  • C-20 polyunsaturated fatty acids, belonging to omega-3 and also omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid families, are the precursors eicosanoids (prostaglandins, prostacyclin, thromboxanes, and leukotrienes), potent, short-acting, local hormones.
  • While the omission in the diet of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids results in a manifest systemic dysfunction, the deprivation of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids causes dysfunction in a wide range of behavioral and physiological modalities.
References

Akoh C.C. and Min D.B. “Food lipids: chemistry, nutrition, and biotechnology” 3th ed. 2008

Aron H. Uber den Nahvert (On the nutritional value). Biochem Z. 1918;92:211–233 (German)

Bender D.A. “Benders’ dictionary of nutrition and food technology”. 2006, 8th Edition. Woodhead Publishing. Oxford

Bergstroem S., Danielsson H., Klenberg D. and Samuelsson B. The enzymatic conversion of essential fatty acids into prostaglandins. J Biol Chem 1964;239:PC4006-PC4008 [Full Text]

Burr G. and Burr M. A new deficiency disease produced by the rigid exclusion of fat from the diet. J Biol Chem 1929;82:345-67 [Full Text]

Chow Ching K. “Fatty acids in foods and their health implication” 3th ed. 2008

Cozzani I. e Dainese E. “Biochimica degli alimenti e della nutrizione”. Piccin Editore, 2006

Mahan L.K., Escott-Stump S.: “Krause’s foods, nutrition, and diet therapy” 10th ed. 2000

Rosenthal M.D., Glew R.H. Mediacal biochemistry. Human metabolism in health and disease. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 2009

Shils M.E., Olson J.A., Shike M., Ross A.C.: “Modern nutrition in health and disease” 9th ed. 1999

Stipanuk M.H.. Biochemical and physiological aspects of human nutrition. W.B. Saunders Company-An imprint of Elsevier Science, 2000

Van D., Beerthuis R.K., Nugteren D.H. and Vonkeman H. Enzymatic conversion of all-cis-polyunsaturated fatty acids into prostaglandins. Nature 1964;203:839-41

Essential fatty acids

Essential fatty acids: contents in brief

What are essential fatty acids?

Essential Fatty Acids
Fig. 1 – EFA

Essential fatty acids or EFA are fatty acids which cannot be synthesized de novo by animals, but by plants and microorganisms, such as bacteria, fungi and molds, and whose deficiency can be reversed by dietary addition.
There are two essential fatty acids: linoleic acid or LA (18:2n-6) and α-linolenic acid or ALA (18:3n-3), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) with 18 carbon atoms, belonging to omega-6 and omega-3 families, respectively.
Animals cannot synthesize these two fatty acids because they lack desaturases that introduce double bonds beyond the Δ9 position (carbon atoms numbered from the methyl end), namely:

  • Δ12-desaturase (E.C. 1.14.19.6), which catalyzes the synthesis of LA from oleic acid;
  • Δ15-desaturase (EC 1.14.19.25), present also in phytoplankton, which catalyzes the synthesis of ALA from linoleic acid.

Essential Fatty AcidsInstead, animals have the enzymes needed to elongate and desaturate, though with low efficiency, the two EFA to form PUFAs with 20, 22, or 24 carbon atoms and up to 6 double bonds, such as for example  dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid or DGLA (20:3n6), arachidonic acid or AA (20:4n6), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n3), and docosahexaenoic acid or DHA (22:6n3).
If diet is deficient in EFA, also fatty acids synthesized from them become essential. For this reason they may be termed conditionally essential fatty acids.
It should be noted that all essential fatty acids are polyunsaturated molecules but not all polyunsaturated fatty acids are essential, such as those belonging to the omega-7 and omega-9 families.

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Functions of essential fatty acids and their PUFA derivatives

Essential Fatty Acids
Fig. 2 – Docosahexaenoic Acid

The first evidence of their existence dates back to 1918, when Hans Aron suggested that dietary fat could be essential for the healthy growth of animals and that, besides its caloric contribution, there was a inherent nutritive value deriving from the presence of certain lipid molecules
In 1927, Herbert M. Evans and George Oswald Burr demonstrated that, despite the addition of vitamins A, D, and E to the diet, a deficiency of fat severely affected both growth and reproduction of experimental animals. Therefore, they suggested the presence in the fat of an essential substance they called vitamin F.
Eleven years after Aron work, in 1929, George Burr and his wife Mildred developed the hypothesis that warm-blooded animals were not able to synthesize appreciable amounts of certain fatty acids. One year later, they discovered that linoleic acid was essential for animals, and it was they who coined the term essential fatty acid.
However, EFA deficiency in humans was first described only in 1958, in infants fed a milk-based formula lacking them.
And in 1964, thanks to the research by Van Dorp et al. and Bergstroem et al., one of their biological functions, that is, being precursor for the synthesis of prostaglandins, was discovered.
Now, it is clear that EFA and derived PUFAs play many important roles, some of which are listed below.

  • They are fundamental components of biological membranes, modulating, for example, their fluidity, particularly DHA.
  • They are essential for the proper development and functioning of the nervous system, particularly AA and DHA.
  • They are involved in membrane signal transduction, particularly omega-6 fatty acids, such as membrane phospholipid arachidonic acid.
  • They are involved in the regulation of genes encoding lipolytic and lipogenic enzymes. In fact they are strong inducers of  fatty acid oxidation, as well as inhibitors of their synthesis and that of triglycerides, at least in animal models, by acting, for example, as:

activators of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α or PPAR-α, which stimulates, among other things, the transcription of genes encoding lipolytic enzymes as well as mitochondrial and peroxisomal β-oxidation enzymes, and inhibits the transcription of genes encoding for enzymes involved in lipogenesis;

inhibitors of sterol responsive element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) gene transcription, a hepatic transcription factor required for liver fatty acid and triglyceride synthesis induced by insulin.
Note: PUFA also increase SREBP 1c mRNA degradation as well as SREBP-1 protein degradation.

  • They are precursors of signaling molecules, with autocrine and paracrine action, which act as mediators in many cellular processes. Eicosanoids, a group of oxygenated, 20 carbon fatty acids, are probably the most studied. They derive from linoleic acid, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, arachidonic acid, and EPA, and include prostaglandins, thromboxanes, leukotrienes, lipoxins, and  epoxyeicosatrienoic acids.
  • They are essential, especially LA present in sphingolipids of the stratum corneum of the skin, for the formation of the barrier against water loss from the skin itself.
  • They have a crucial role in the prevention of many diseases, particularly coronary heart disease or CHD, acting as antihypertensive, antithrombotic, and triglyceridelowering agents (increasing in the latter case mitochondrial β-oxidation).
  • Finally, energy storage function is marginal.

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Foods rich in essential fatty acids and derived PUFAs

Linoleic acid, produced mainly by terrestrial plants, is the most abundant polyunsaturated fatty acid in the Western diet, and accounts for 85-90% of dietary omega-6 fatty acids.
In the human diet, the richest sources are vegetable oils and seeds of many plants, such as:

  • safflower oil, ~ 740 mg/g
  • sunflower oil, ~ 600 mg/g
  • soybean oil, ~ 530 mg/g
  • corn oil, ~ 500 mg/g
  • cotton seed oil, ~ 480 mg/g
  • walnuts, ~ 340 mg/g
  • brazil nuts, ~ 250 mg/g
  • peanut oil, ~ 240 mg/100 g
  • canola oil, ~ 190 mg/g
  • peanuts, ~140 mg/g
  • flaxseed oil, ~ 135 mg/g

Linoleic acid is present in fair amount also in animal products such as chicken eggs or lard, but only because it is present in their feed.
It should be noted that some of the major sources of LA such as walnuts, flax seed oil, soybean oil, and canola oil are also rich sources of α-linolenic acid (see below).
In seed oils, omega-6 fatty acids with a chain length longer than 18 carbon atoms, such as DGLA and arachidonic acid, are present only in traces. Instead, AA is found in all animal tissues and animal-based foods.

α-Linolenic acid is produced by plants, also cold water vegetation such as algae and phytoplankton.
In the human diet, some of the richest sources are:

  • flax seed oil, ~ 550 mg/g
  • rapeseed oil, ~ 85 mg/g
  • soybean oil, ~ 75 mg/g

Other foods rich in ALA are nuts, ~ 70 mg/g, and soybeans, ~ 10 mg/g.
EPA and DHA are mainly found in marine algae, and in engineered algae DHA can represent about 50% of the total fatty acids. In the human diet, EPA and DHA derive from fish, shellfish and fish oil, particularly that derived from cold-water fatty fish.

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Essential fatty acids in Western diets

Over the past 50 years, Western diet has been enriched in saturated fatty acids and omega-6 fatty acids, whereas has become poor  in omega-3 fatty acids, with an omega-6/omega-3 ratio between 10/1 and 20/1, and hence, far from the recommended ratio of 5:1.
This high ratio is due to several factors, some of which are listed below.

  • While wild plant foods are typically high in omega-3 fatty acids, in industrial agriculture crops rich in omega-6 fatty acids have had greater success than those rich in omega-3 fatty acids.
  • The low consumption of seafood and fish oil.
  • The high consumption of animal products derived from animals, such as chickens, cattle and pigs, raised on corn-based feed. In addition to this, omega-3 fatty acid content, of some species of farmed fish is lower than their wild counterparts, again because of the feed used.
  • The high consumption of vegetable oils low in omega-3 fatty acids and high in omega-6 fatty acids, such as safflower oil, sunflower oil, soybean oil and corn oil.
  • The increased shelf life of those foods in which omega-6 fatty acids predominate over omega-3-fatty acids.

So, although it is desirable to increase consumption of omega-3 fatty acids, this will not occur easily.

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Omega-6/omega-3 ratio

Many evidences, like lower rates of incidence of cancer, autoimmunity and coronary heart disease in populations whose diet has a high ratio of omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acids, such as Eskimos, Japanese and others who consume a large amount of seafood, suggest that the change of this ratio has affected human physiology adversely, promoting, together with other factors such as smoking and a sedentary lifestyle, the development of the main classes of diseases.
Note: Japanese are the only people with an omega-3/omega-6 ratio of 1/2-4.

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Recommended dietary intake of essential fatty acids

Hereinafter, the recommended dietary intake for omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids for healthy adults, according to the recommendation of some of the major scientific societies and international organizations, and, as you will see, there is no common position.

  • Omega-3 fatty acids
    WHO recommends a dietary intake of omega-3-fatty acids between 0.5 and 2% of energy/day, with 300-500 mg of EPA/DHA per day, and 0.8-1.1 g per day of α-linolenic acid.
    Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends a dietary intake of 500 mg of EPA/DHA per day.
    European Food Safety recommends a dietary intake of 250 mg of EPA/DHA per day.
    American Heart Association and American Diabetes Association recommend to eat fish at least twice a week, particularly fatty fish.
    American Heart Association recommends to include oils and foods rich in α-linolenic acid.
  • Omega-6 fatty acids
    In the past, dietary recommendations for omega-6 fatty acid intakes, and so especially linoleic acid, were focused on the prevention of their deficiency, while currently they are focused on the determination of the optimal intake to reduce the risk of chronic diseases, with special attention to CHD.
    Currently, most scientific societies recommend a daily intake of linoleic acid between 5 and 10% of energy/day. This daily intake seems able to reduce the risk of CHD and coronary heart disease deaths compared to lower intakes.

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References

Akoh C.C. and Min D.B. “Food lipids: chemistry, nutrition, and biotechnology” 3th ed. 2008

Bergstroem S., Danielsson H., Klenberg D. and Samuelsson B. The enzymatic conversion of essential fatty acids into prostaglandins. J Biol Chem 1964;239:PC4006-PC4008 [Full Text]

Burr G. O., Burr M. M. and Miller E. S. On the fatty acids essential in nutrition. III. J Biol Chem 1932;97:1-9 [PDF]

Chow Ching K. “Fatty acids in foods and their health implication” 3th ed. 2008

De Meester F., Watson R.R.,Zibadi S. Omega-6/3 fatty acids: functions, sustainability strategies and perspectives. Springer Science & Business Media, 2012 [Google eBook]

Evans H. M. and G. O. Burr. A new dietary deficiency with highly purified diets. III. The beneficial effect of fat in the diet. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med 1928;25:390-7. doi:10.3181/00379727-25-3867

FAO. Global Recommendations for EPA and DHA Intake (As of 30 June 2014) [PDF]

Harris W.S., Mozaffarian D., Rimm E.B., Kris-Etherton P.M., Rudel L.L., Appel L.J., Engler M.M., Engler M.B., Sacks F.M. Omega-6 fatty acids and risk for cardiovascular disease. Circulation 2009;119:902-7. doi:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.108.191627

Rosenthal M.D., Glew R.H. Mediacal biochemistry. Human metabolism in health and disease. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 2009

Shils M.E., Olson J.A., Shike M., Ross A.C.: “Modern nutrition in health and disease” 9th ed. 1999

Simopoulos A.P. The importance of the omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid ratio in cardiovascular disease and other chronic diseases. Exp Biol Med 2008;233(6):674-88. doi:10.1016/S0753-3322(02)00253-6

Van Dorp. D.A., Beerthuis R.K., Nugteren D.H. and Vonkeman H. Enzymatic conversion of all-cis-polyunsaturated fatty acids into prostaglandins. Nature 1964;203:839-41. doi:10.1038/203839a0

Vannice G., Rasmussen H. Position of the academy of nutrition and dietetics: dietary fatty acids for healthy adults. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2014;114(1):136-53. doi:10.1016/j.jand.2013.11.001

Nutrition for athletes: strategies for training and competition

Nutrition for athletes: science and myths

Nutrition for Athletes
Fig. 1 – Fruit and Vegetables

The right diet is one of the basic foundations for achieving the best athletic performance.
Unfortunately, there aren’t special diets or “magic” foods.
Athletes, as the rest of the population, should follow a Mediterranean-type diet, so providing an adequate intake of energy, of mineral salts, vitamins, antioxidants, fiber and water, keeping at the same time  good  balance  of caloric intake by wisely splitting it during the day.
Finally, they should avoid as much as possible industrial foods or fast foods.

Nutrition for athletes and the distribution of meals and calories

Still more than sedentary man, because of his greater caloric intake, athlete will have to consume more meals during the day to avoid concentrating an excessive amount of calories (and food) in one meal.
In this way, he will:

  • avoid reaching lunch-time and especially dinner-time with an excessive hunger;
  • digest foods more easily, not engaging the digestive system with too much abundant meals.
  • avoid any increases in blood chemistry parameters associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, such as hypertriglyceridemia and hypercholesterolemia.

Of course, in nutrition for athletes, the distribution of the meals will have to consider also training and competition times. The best distribution might be: breakfast, lunch and dinner plus two snacks, one in the morning and the other in the afternoon.

Breakfast

Nutrition for Athletes
Fig. 2 – Glass of Milk

It is of one of most important and often underestimated meals of the day, that should never be skipped.
Typical breakfast foods are milk and/or yogurt, fruit juice (better if freshly squeezed seasonal fruit; when you buy a packaged fruit juice, select it without added sugar/sweeteners and with a caloric content of about 45 kcal/100 g), freshly made tea,bread, dry cookies without cream (however moderately), corn flakes without addition of syrup, honey, fresh/dry fruit, chocolate, and jam/honey (the last three in moderation).
Breakfast will be consumed considering the time when physical activity, and still more the competition, is made.
In nutrition for athletes, as for sedentary population,the breakfast should represent about 15% of the daily caloric intake, to pass to 20% without mid-morning snack.

Lunch

It should represent the meal in which the major part of complex carbohydrates is taken up that is pasta, rice, barley, cous-cous, oats, millet, etc (better if “al dente” with a light seasoning), based on personal preferences.
To limit glycemic increase it is advisable to eat, after a dish rich in carbohydrates, vegetables, fresh or cooked (in the latter when possible, better if steamed), but avoiding potatoes, cooked carrots and onions (foods with an high glycemic index). Bread, if present, should be eaten moderately.
At the end of the lunch a fruit can be eaten as well (if it doesn’t cause feelings of bloating when eaten at the end of the meal; in the case, fruit may be eaten during snacks) and/or a dessert without cream.
Seasonal fruit and vegetable will ensure an adequate intake of mineral salts, vitamins, fiber and water.
It is advisable having lunch at least two-three hours before the start of training sessions/competition, in order to allow a complete digestion, normalization of postprandial glycemic peaks and of insulin response before starting workout.
In nutrition for athletes, the lunch should represent 25-30% of the daily caloric intake.

Dinner

In this meal, it is advisable to give priority to proteins rather than carbohydrates, hence fish, white or red meat (the last one lean and less frequently) or legumes (rich in slow absorption carbohydrates, fiber and mineral salts) will be present, with seasonal vegetables, fresh or cooked, (recommended is also a vegetable soup, that will help in restoring liquids), moderate bread, and fruit (if it doesn’t cause feelings of bloating when eaten at the end of the meal, as seen for lunch).
It is advisable to eat legumes at dinner to avoid bothersome bloating during training.
In nutrition for athletes, the dinner should represent 25-30% of the daily caloric intake.

Snacks

In nutrition for athletes, to ensure adequate distribution of calories, often much higher than in the sedentary man and avoid an excessive accumulation at major meals, at least two snacks must be present, one at mid-morning and the other at mid-afternoon. Assume preferably fruit (moderately also dry fruit, advisable walnuts and almonds), yogurt/milk, dry cookies or a sandwich with lean sliced salami (e.g. lean raw ham or cured raw beef), cottage cheese (soft fresh cheese) or simply with extra-virgin olive oil and tomato or other vegetables (always choose seasonal vegetables).
The snack should represent 10-15% of the daily caloric intake.

Nutrition for athletes and caloric intake

In nutrition for athletes, caloric intake must be matched to energy consumption that, in turn, depends on:

  • sex;
  • age;
  • growing phase;
  • physical structure;
  • level of physical activity (training plane, competition, recovery);
  • even possible pathological states.

Athlete’s diet must consider energy consumption due to workload sustained during training sessions.
In fact, if there are sports (as swimming, running, rowing or cross-country skiing) whose training sessions cause an increase of energy requirement in excess of 50% compared to needs referred to a moderately active lifestyle, in other sports (as artistic or rhythmic gymnastics, shooting etc.) the consumption related to the activity may be modest.
So, the only difference in nourishment between a sedentary or moderately active man and an athlete engaged in sports causing a large increase of energy requirement will be of quantitative type: the greater is the energy expenditure linked to physical activity, the greater will be the caloric intake.

References

Giampietro M. L’alimentazione per l’esercizio fisico e lo sport. Il Pensiero Scientifico Editore. Prima edizione 2005

Jeukendrup A.E. Nutrition for endurance sports: marathon, triathlon, and road cycling. J Sport Sci 2011:29;sup1, S91-S99 [Abstract]

Mahan L.K., Escott-Stump S.: “Krause’s foods, nutrition, and diet therapy” 10th ed. 2000

Shils M.E., Olson J.A., Shike M., Ross A.C.: “Modern nutrition in health and disease” 9th ed. 1999

Nutrition and sport: what to eat?

The major part of the calories (55-60%) must derive from carbohydrates (complex ones 80%, simple ones 20%), essential fuels for the muscle both during rapid and intense efforts than in endurance performances, present in daily feeding in great amounts in pasta, rice, spelt, barley, cous-cous, potatoes, bread, legumes (many of them rich in proteins as well), rusks, biscuits, corn flakes, sweet fruit, even dry sweet fruit, etc.
Lipids (fats and oils), important energy source for sports in which aerobic metabolism is greatly involved as those of long duration, should bring 25-30% of daily calories. The main lipid source, in a Mediterranean diet, is extra-virgin olive oil (the foundation of Mediterranean diet); the remaining part will came from those present foods (the so-called “hidden fat”) as in meat and meat products, milk and cheeses, eggs, oily dry fruits, oilseed etc. and, between seasoning fats, butter (better avoid margarine, often rich in industrial trans fatty acids, a real poison). As previously mentioned it is advisable to avoid fast food and industrial products (in particular bakery products such as cookies, snacks, cakes, croissants, pastries, French fries, fried chicken etc.) because lipids present in these foods, unless clearly specified in the package, are never extra-virgin olive oil but mostly palm or coconut oil and often partially hydrogenated vegetable oils as well.
The daily lipid intake must not be less than 20% of daily calories because it could occur an insufficient intake of essential fatty acids and fat-soluble vitamins; moreover, considering athletes with very high energetic demands, their deficiency would cause too much abundant meals (lipids 9 Kcal/g, carbohydrates 4 Kcal/g, so more than double) and not very desirable (fats increase palatability of foods).
The remaining calories (12-15%) come from proteins, both of animal origin (meat, fish, egg, milk and dairy products), 2/3 of the total, and vegetal origin (legumes and cereals), the remaining 1/3.

References

Yo-yo effect or weight cycling

What is yo-yo effect?

Weight cycling or yo-yo effect, i.e. repeated phases of loss and weight gain, appears related to excess weight and accumulation of fat in the abdomen.

Yo-yo effect and health

Several studies suggest a link with increased blood pressure, increased blood cholesterol, with gallbladder disease, with a significant increase in binge eating disorder, in women with greater easy to weight gain than those who are not subject to weight cycling. In this regard there should be emphasized that the weight cycling occurs over years, during which, aging, the rate of metabolism inevitably tends to decrease: this could make more difficult the subsequent losses.
Finally, weight cycling was also associated with a sense of depression with regard to weight.

References

Cereda E., Malavazos A.E., Caccialanza R., Rondanelli M., Fatati G. and Barichella M. Weight cycling is associated with body weight excess and abdominal fat accumulation: a cross-sectional study. Clin Nutr 2011;30(6):718-23 [Abstract]

Sachiko T. St. Jeor S.T. St., Howard B.V., Prewitt T.E., Bovee V., Bazzarre T., Eckel T.H., for the AHA Nutrition Committee. Dietary Protein and Weight Reduction. A Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the Nutrition Committee of the Council on Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Metabolism of the American Heart Association. Circulation 2001;104:1869-74 [Abstract] [PDF]

Invert sugar: definition, production, uses

What is invert sugar?

Invert sugar (also known as inverted sugar) is sucrose partially or totally cleaved into fructose and glucose (also known dextrose) and, apart from the chemical process used (see below), the obtained solution has the same amount of the two monosaccharides.
Moreover, according to the product, not cleaved sucrose may also be present.

Invert sugar production

Invert Sugar
Fig. 1 – Apis mellifera

The breakdown of sucrose may happen in a reaction catalyzed by enzymes, such as:

  • sucrase, active at our own intestinal level;
  • invertase, an enzyme secreted by honeybees into the honey and used industrially to obtain invert sugar.

Another process applies acid action, as it happens partly in our own stomach and as it happened in the old times, and still happens, at home-made and industrial level. Sulfuric and hydrochloric acids was used, heating the solution with caution for some time; in fact the reaction is as fast as the solution is acid, regardless of the type of acid used, and as higher the temperature is. The acidity is then reduced or neutralized with alkaline substances, as soda or sodium bicarbonate.

A chemical process as described occurs when acid foods are prepared; i.e. in the preparation of jams and marmalades, where both conditions of acidity, naturally, and high temperatures, by heating, are present. The situation is analogous when fruit juices are sweetened with sucrose.
The reaction develops at room temperature as well, obviously more slowly.
What is the practical outcome of that?
It means that, during storage, also sweets and acid foods, even those just seen, go towards a slow reaction of inversion of contained/residue sucrose, with consequent modification of the sweetness, since invert sugar at low temperatures is sweeter (due to the presence of fructose), and assumption of a different taste profile.

Properties and uses of invert sugar

It is principally utilized in confectionery and ice-cream industries thanks to some peculiar characteristics.

  • It has an higher affinity for water (hydrophilicity) than sucrose (see fructose) therefore it keeps food more humid: e.g. cakes made with invert sugar dry up less easily.
  • It avoids or slows down crystal formation (dextrose and fructose form less crystals than sucrose), property useful in confectionery industries for icings and coverage.
  • It has a lower freezing point.
  • It increases, just a bit, the sweetness of the product in which it has been added, as it is sweeter than an equal amount of sucrose (the sweetness of fructose depends on the temperature in which it is present).
  • It may take part to Maillard reaction (sucrose can’t do it) thus contributing to the color and taste of several bakery products.

It should be noted that honey, lacking in sucrose, has almost the same composition in fructose and glucose of the 100% invert sugar (fructose is slightly more abundant than glucose). So, diluted honey, better if not much aromatic, may replace industrial invert sugar.

References

Belitz .H.-D., Grosch W., Schieberle P. “Food Chemistry” 4th ed. Springer, 2009

Bender D.A. “Benders’ Dictionary of Nutrition and Food Technology”. 8th Edition. Woodhead Publishing. Oxford, 2006

Bressanini-lescienze.blogautore.espresso.repubblica.it

Mahan LK, Escott-Stump S.: “Krause’s foods, nutrition, and diet therapy” 10th ed. 2000

Shils M.E., Olson J.A., Shike M., Ross A.C. “Modern nutrition in health and disease” 9th ed., by Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, 1999

Body weight: what to do not to increase it

In order to maintain body weight: adjust caloric intake according to consumption

Body Weight: Adjust Caloric Intake According to Consumption
Fig. 1 – Adjust Caloric Intake According to Consumption

In order to maintain your body weight, energy intake with foods must match your individual needs, depending on age, sex and level of physical activity; calories exceeding needs accumulate in form of fat that will deposit in various parts of the body (typically in men, as in postmenopausal women, the accumulation area for excellence is abdomen).
An example: let’s assume an energy requirement of 2000 kcal with an intake of 2100 kcal. The extra 100 kcal could result from 30 g of pasta or 35 g of bread or a 25 g package of crackers or 120 g of potatoes or 10 g of oils from any source etc., not a particularly large amount of food. This modest calories surplus, if performed daily for one year leads us to take:
100 kcal x 365 days = 36500 kcal/year extra calories compared to needs.
Since a kilogram of body fat contains approximately 7000 kcal, if we assume that 36500 kcal in excess accumulate exclusively in form of fat (very plausible approximation), we obtain: 36500/7000 = about 5 kilogram of body fat.
So, even a modest daily calorie surplus, over a year, can lead to a substantial body weight gain in the form of fat mass.
This example shows the importance of estimating with accuracy our daily energy requirements.

In order to maintain body weight: split daily caloric intake into multiple meals

Let’s assume that daily caloric requirement to maintain body weight is equal to 2000 kcal.
Is it the same thing if they are consumed in just two meals, maybe dividing them in half between lunch and dinner, or is it advisable to take three to five meals during a day?
In order to mantain body weight, the best choice  is to divide calories into five meals: breakfast, lunch and dinner, the most abundant, plus two snacks, one on mid-morning and the other on mid-afternoon. Why? There are various reasons.

  • Consuming only two meals during the day, lunch and dinner or breakfast and dinner, it is likely to approach both meals with a hunger difficult to control; we eat what we have on our plate already thinking about what else to eat, having the feeling of not being able to satisfy the hunger. We eat, but there is always room for more food. Among the reasons for this there are too many hours between meals. Two examples:

dinner at 8:00 p.m. and, the next day, lunch at 1:00 p.m.: the interval is 17 hours, more than 2/3 of a day;

breakfast at 7:00 a.m. and dinner to 8:00 p.m., 13 hours have passed, most of which are spent in working activities and therefore more energy-consuming than hours of sleep.

Then, drops in blood sugar levels (glycemia) can also occur: liver glycogen stores, essential for maintaining normal glycemia, with time intervals between meals previously seen, can easily reach values close to depletion.

Therefore, by splitting the daily caloric intake into two meals, it is most likely difficult to meet the target of assuming 2000 kcal (the suggested daily calorie intake).

  • The concentration of too many calories in a single meal may promote the increase of plasma triglycerides, the excess of which is linked to the onset of cardiovascular disease.
  • When accumulating almost all or all of the calories in just two meals we are likely to grow stout, have feelings of bloating and getting real digestive problems due to excess of ingested food, not to mention that could occur even a postprandial sleepiness or difficulties in getting asleep.

In order to maintain body weight: exercise regularly

Physical activity has a central role both in maintaining the reached body weight and in the loss of fat mass.
Make physical activity on a regular basis has several advantages.

  • If exercise is conducted on a regular basis and is structured in the proper way, is possible that, even without appreciable changes in weight, a redistribution of fat occurs between fat mass, which drops, and free fat mass, which, on the contrary, increases. Such a result can’t obviously be reached by simple walk; we need a specific training program, better if planned by a professional, and a proper diet, always of Mediterranean type.
  • We protect muscle mass (and as suggested in point 1. we can also increase it).
  • We maintain a high metabolism.
  • Muscle burn energy during and especially after exercise.
  • The body is toned.
  • Appetite is controlled more easily.
  • Making physical activity on a regular basis makes the prevention of weight gain easier, due to the inevitable “escapades” (indulging in a bit of chocolate, an ice cream etc..).
References

Giampietro M. L’alimentazione per l’esercizio fisico e lo sport. Il Pensiero Scientifico Editore. Prima edizione 2005

Mahan L.K., Escott-Stump S.: “Krause’s foods, nutrition, and diet therapy” 10th ed. 2000

Shils M.E., Olson J.A., Shike M., Ross A.C.: “Modern nutrition in health and disease” 9th ed. 1999