Carbohydrate ingestion during exercise of relatively short duration and high intensity

Intermittent high intensity exercise and carbohydrate ingestion

High Intensity: During-Exercise Nutrition
Fig. 1- During-Exercise Nutrition

Carbohydrate ingestion during intermittent high intensity or prolonged (>90 min) sub-maximal exercise can:

  • increase exercise capacity;
  • improve exercise performance;
  • postpone fatigue.

The intake of very small amounts of carbohydrates or carbohydrate mouth rinsing (for example with a 6% maltodextrin solution) may improve exercise performance by 2-3% when the exercise is of relatively short duration (<1 h) and high intensity (>75% VO2max), that is, an exercise not limited by the availability of muscle glycogen stores, given adequate diet.
The underlying mechanisms for the ergogenic effect of carbohydrates during this type of activity are not metabolic but may reside in the central nervous system: it seems that carbohydrates are detected in the oral cavity by unidentified receptors, promoting an enhanced sense of well-being and improving pacing.
These effects are independent of taste or sweet and non-sweet of carbohydrates but are specific to carbohydrates.

It should be noted that performance effects with drink ingestion are similar to the mouth rinse; therefore athletes, when they don’t complain of gastrointestinal distress when ingesting too much fluid, may have an advantage taking the drink (in endurance sports, dehydration and carbohydrate depletion are the most likely contributors to fatigue).

Conclusion

It seems that during exercise of relatively short duration (<1 h) and high intensity (>75% VO2max) it is not necessary to ingest large amounts of carbohydrates: a carbohydrate mouth rinsing or the intake of very small amounts of carbohydrates may be sufficient to obtain a performance benefit.

References

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