Skeletal muscle glycogen stores and sports

Functions of skeletal muscle glycogen

Muscle glycogen represents a source of glucose, therefore energy, that can be used by muscle during physical activity: it is an energy store where needed!
Furthermore a close relationship exists between the onset of fatigue and depletion of its muscle stores.

Glycogen as energy source

Carbohydrates and fatty acids (lipids) represent the main energy source for muscle during exercise and their relative contribution varies depending on:

  • the intensity and duration of exercise;
  • the level of training.

If for fatty acids there are no problems regarding body stores so it is not for carbohydrates whose stores, present in glycogen form principally in the liver and the muscle, are modest, less than 5% of total body energy stores: in a non-fasting 70 kg adult male there are about 250 g of glycogen in the muscle and 100 g in the liver, for a total energy of about 1400 kcal. In athletes the amount could be higher, for example in the best marathoners, again considering an adult male as above, you can reach up to 475 g in total, muscle plus liver, which corresponds to about 1900 kcal.
In spite of this, glycogen contribution to the total energy needed to sustain muscular workload rises with the increase of exercise intensity, whereas we reduce that in the form of fatty acids.
Furthermore, in the absence of replenishment with exogenous carbohydrates, performance is determined by the endogenous stores of liver and skeletal muscle glycogen, of which relative consumption is different: an increase of intensity increases that of the second (muscle) while remain more or less constant in that of the first (liver).

Skeletal muscle glycogen and intese exercises

In fact, skeletal muscle glycogen represents the most important energy reserve for prolonged moderate-high intensity exercise, an importance that increase in the case of high-intensity interval exercise (common in training session undertaken by swimmers runners, rowers or in team-sport players) or in resistance exercise, therefore both endurance and resistance exercises. If for example we consider the marathon about 80% of utilized energy derives from carbohydrate oxidation, for the most part skeletal muscle glycogen.
Finally, the replenishment rate of glycogen stores in post-exercise is one of the most important factors in establishing necessary recovery time.

Muscle glycogen and fatigue

Fatigue and low glycogen levels are closely correlate but it is not clear which mechanisms are at the basis of this relationship; one hypothesis is that there exists a minimum glycogen concentration that is “protected” and is resistant to being used during exercise, perhaps to ensure an energy reserve in case of extreme necessity.
Because of the closely relationship between skeletal muscle glycogen depletion and fatigue, its replenish rate in the post-exercise is one of the most important factors in determining necessary recovery time.

References

Arienti G. “Le basi molecolari della nutrizione”. Seconda edizione. Piccin, 2003

Cozzani I. and Dainese E. “Biochimica degli alimenti e della nutrizione”. Piccin Editore, 2006

Giampietro M. “L’alimentazione per l’esercizio fisico e lo sport”. Il Pensiero Scientifico Editore, 2005

Mahan LK, Escott-Stump S.: “Krause’s foods, nutrition, and diet therapy” 10th ed. 2000

Mariani Costantini A., Cannella C., Tomassi G. “Fondamenti di nutrizione umana”. 1th ed. Il Pensiero Scientifico Editore, 1999

Nelson D.L., M. M. Cox M.M. Lehninger. Principles of biochemistry. 4th Edition. W.H. Freeman and Company, 2004

Stipanuk M.H.. “Biochemical and physiological aspects of human nutrition” W.B. Saunders Company-An imprint of Elsevier Science, 2000

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